alexkarle.com

Source for alexkarle.com
git clone git://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com.git
Log | Files | Refs | README | LICENSE

commit c0f2dfabf2395169a0bd248e8ca8b137753e8f87 (patch)
parent 9d3f2cd2aa2f45178abd56b75c1041638b455c06
Author: Alex Karle <alex@alexkarle.com>
Date:   Tue, 14 Dec 2021 00:35:12 -0500

Move whole site from mdoc->nihdoc, with blog post!

This is a mega commit from weeks of work on nihdoc [1] and generally
reshaping every page on the website. I'm really pleased with how it
turned out & am ready to show it to the world!

Some big changes:

- All pages are now .txt source instead of .7 mdoc, using my own
  custom markup parser (to keep it all in base)

- New blog post announcing changes

- The new format meant genatom and the gopher listing needed
  reworking (I think both look significantly better!)

- All blog posts moved to /blog/ to enable a breadcrumb-style
  navigation. I'll set up redirects on httpd(8) to keep old links
  working as expected

- All files moved into the www/ directory to match how the gopher/
  directory is gopher-specific

- The source (.txt) is now being bundled in the install, so that
  users (read: me) can introspect it.

- There is a new builds.sr.ht config to enable akarle.srht.site to
  be a "deploy preview" of sorts (really nice to link to friends for
  feedback). I don't plan on using it for alexkarle.com any time
  soon due to (1) needing gopher support and (2) wanting to keep the
  redirects live.

- I'm slowly moving towards recommending/linking sourcehut over
  linking to git.alexkarle.com -- I'm not deprecating the latter, but
  I have a feeling the former will outlive it (and I want to point
  it as a viable option for readers!)

[1]: https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/nihdoc

Diffstat:
A.build.yml | 19+++++++++++++++++++
M.gitignore | 18+++++++-----------
DBLM.7 | 18------------------
DLINKS | 11-----------
MMakefile | 117+++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------------------------------------
DORDER | 18------------------
MREADME.md | 51+++++++++++++++++++--------------------------------
Da-new-hope.7 | 22----------------------
Mbin/genatom.sh | 32++++++++++++++++----------------
Abin/gencrumbs | 26++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dbin/genpost.sh | 28----------------------------
Mbin/jam-index.sh | 74++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------
Mbin/jam-stats.sh | 2+-
Dbin/newpost | 27---------------------------
Dblog.7 | 67-------------------------------------------------------------------
Dburrowing.7 | 113-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dcreative-coding.7 | 71-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ddomain-names.7 | 41-----------------------------------------
Rlogo.png -> git/logo.png | 0
Agopher/bin/blogidx.sh | 7+++++++
Mgopher/blog/index.gph | 5+++--
Mgopher/jam-tuesday/stats | 2+-
Dintro.7 | 38--------------------------------------
Djam-tuesday.7 | 37-------------------------------------
Djam-tuesday/index.html | 255-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dlicense.7 | 26--------------------------
Dmake-obj.7 | 156-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dmy-old-man.7 | 159-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Don-writing.7 | 58----------------------------------------------------------
Dself-hosted.7 | 98-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dstyle.css | 90-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dtext-only.7 | 89-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Duse-feeds.7 | 142-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Duse-git.7 | 141-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Duses.7 | 129-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Awww/LICENSE | 2++
Awww/blog/BLM.txt | 12++++++++++++
Awww/blog/a-new-hope.txt | 13+++++++++++++
Awww/blog/burrowing.txt | 78++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/creative-coding.txt | 44++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/domain-names.txt | 38++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/index.txt | 33+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/make-obj.txt | 87+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/mdoc-to-nihdoc.txt | 164+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/my-old-man-orig.html | 268+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/my-old-man.txt | 143+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/on-writing.txt | 48++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/self-hosted.txt | 54++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/text-only.txt | 70++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/use-feeds.txt | 100+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/blog/use-git.txt | 102+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/footer.html | 5+++++
Awww/header.html | 32++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/index.txt | 49+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Rjam-tuesday/2021-03-09 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-09 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-03-16 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-16 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-03-23 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-23 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-03-30 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-30 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-04-06 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-06 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-04-13 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-13 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-04-20 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-20 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-04-27 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-27 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-05-04 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-05-04 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-05-18 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-05-18 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-05-25 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-05-25 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-06-01 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-01 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-06-08 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-08 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-06-15 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-15 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-06-22 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-22 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-07-06 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-06 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-07-13 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-13 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-07-20 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-20 | 0
Rjam-tuesday/2021-07-27 -> www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-27 | 0
Awww/jam-tuesday/index.html | 293+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Awww/license.txt | 9+++++++++
Awww/uses.txt | 104+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
76 files changed, 1939 insertions(+), 1996 deletions(-)

diff --git a/.build.yml b/.build.yml @@ -0,0 +1,19 @@ +# srht.site build +image: openbsd/latest +oauth: pages.sr.ht/PAGES:RW +sources: + - https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/alexkarle.com + - https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/nihdoc +environment: + site: akarle.srht.site +tasks: +- package: | + make -C nihdoc + env PATH="$PWD/nihdoc:$PATH" make -C alexkarle.com + cd alexkarle.com/www && tar -cvhzf ../../site.tar.gz . +- upload: | + acurl -f https://pages.sr.ht/publish/$site -Fcontent=@site.tar.gz +triggers: +- action: email + condition: always + to: ci@alexkarle.com diff --git a/.gitignore b/.gitignore @@ -1,13 +1,9 @@ -# generated html from man pages -/*.html -/*.txt +# generated html +*.html +!www/header.html +!www/footer.html +!www/jam-tuesday/index.html +!www/blog/my-old-man-orig.html -# atom feed is generated by ./bin/genatom.sh +# atom feeds are generated atom.xml -gopher.atom - -# obj directory on OpenBSD for out-of-tree builds -obj/ - -# Generated sed command to touch up out-of-base Xr references -bin/fixlinks diff --git a/BLM.7 b/BLM.7 @@ -1,18 +0,0 @@ -.Dd July 13, 2020 -.Dt BLM 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm BLM -.Nd Black Lives Matter -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I meant to post about this earlier, but it's better late than never. -.Pp -It's become abundantly clear to me that we need serious structural changes in our country. -I want to raise my voice in solidarity to say that Black Lives Matter. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Lk https://blacklivesmatter.com -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El diff --git a/LINKS b/LINKS @@ -1,11 +0,0 @@ -vim.1 https://www.vim.org -git.1 https://git-scm.com/ -mutt.1 http://mutt.org -pass.1 https://www.passwordstore.org -newsboat.1 https://newsboat.org -stagit.1 https://git.codemadness.org/stagit/ -git-daemon.1 https://git-scm.com/docs/git-daemon -gophernicus.8 https://gophernicus.org -bombadillo.1 https://bombadillo.colorfield.space/ -lynx.1 https://lynx.invisible-island.net/ -sacc.1 https://git.fifth.space/sacc diff --git a/Makefile b/Makefile @@ -1,112 +1,67 @@ # alexkarle.com makefile -# -# a tale of two builds -# -# This Makefile builds both gopher://alexkarle.com (text-only) and -# alexkarle.com (html) from the same mdoc(7) by leveraging inference -# rules. Since this generates a LOT of derived files, it's recommended -# to run BSD make and run `make obj` first to get an out-of-tree build. -# GNU make should work in a pinch though! -# -# targets: -# build [default] -- generates html and text in obj (OpenBSD) or $PWD -# obj -- makes the obj/ directory for out-of-tree build on OpenBSD -# clean -- deletes html and text artifacts -# install -- install to $DESTDIR/{www,gopher} (default: /var/www/htdocs) -# jams -- regenerate jam-tuesday index and stats files - -# gmake defines CURDIR, OpenBSD defines .CURDIR -- one should work -DIR = $(.CURDIR)$(CURDIR) DESTDIR = /var/www/htdocs +CFLAGS = -g -O2 -Wall -Wpedantic -Wextra # Variables used to determine what to build (and clean) -HTML != echo $(DIR)/*.[1-9] | sed 's@$(DIR)/\([^\.]*\)\.[1-9]@\1.html@g' -TEXT != echo $(DIR)/*.[1-9] | sed 's@$(DIR)/\([^\.]*\)\.[1-9]@\1.txt@g' -SETS != find $(DIR)/jam-tuesday -name '[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-*' -NOTES != find $(DIR)/gopher/notes/all -PHLOG != find $(DIR)/gopher/phlog +HTML != echo www/*.txt www/blog/*.txt | sed 's@\([^\.]*\)\.txt@\1.html@g' +SETS != find www/jam-tuesday -name '[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-*' +NOTES != find gopher/notes/all +PHLOG != find gopher/phlog BUILT = $(HTML) \ - $(TEXT) \ - atom.xml \ - index.html \ gopher/notes/index.gph \ - gopher.atom - + gopher/phlog/atom.xml \ + www/atom.xml # Top level targets .PHONY: build build: $(BUILT) .PHONY: jams -jams: jam-tuesday/stats jam-tuesday/index.html - -obj: - mkdir -p obj/jam-tuesday obj/bin obj/gopher/notes +jams: gopher/jam-tuesday/stats www/jam-tuesday/index.html .PHONY: install install: build - # HTML to DESTDIR/www - install -m 755 -Dd $(DESTDIR)/www/jam-tuesday - install -m 444 $(SETS) $(DIR)/jam-tuesday/index.html $(DESTDIR)/www/jam-tuesday - install -m 444 *.html atom.xml $(DIR)/LICENSE $(DIR)/style.css $(DESTDIR)/www - # Text + gopher exclusives to DESTDIR/gopher - cd $(DIR) && pax -rw gopher $(DESTDIR) - pax -rw gopher $(DESTDIR) # for out-of-tree builds + pax -rw www $(DESTDIR) + pax -rw gopher $(DESTDIR) install -m 444 $(SETS) $(DESTDIR)/gopher/jam-tuesday - install -m 444 $(DIR)/LICENSE $(DESTDIR)/gopher - for f in *.txt; do \ - install -m 444 $$f $(DESTDIR)/gopher/blog/$$(grep $$f $(DIR)/ORDER); \ - done - install -m 444 atom.xml $(DESTDIR)/gopher/blog - cp $(DIR)/gopher/bin/* $(DESTDIR)/gopher/code - for d in jam-tuesday blog code; do \ - (cat $(DIR)/gopher/$$d/index.gph; \ - $(DIR)/gopher/bin/dirlist $(DESTDIR)/gopher/$$d)\ + install -m 444 LICENSE $(DESTDIR)/gopher + install -m 444 www/blog/*.txt www/atom.xml $(DESTDIR)/gopher/blog + install -m 444 gopher/bin/* $(DESTDIR)/gopher/code + for d in jam-tuesday code; do \ + (cat gopher/$$d/index.gph; \ + gopher/bin/dirlist $(DESTDIR)/gopher/$$d)\ > $(DESTDIR)/gopher/$$d/index.gph; \ done - install -m 444 gopher.atom $(DESTDIR)/gopher/phlog/atom.xml + (cat gopher/blog/index.gph; gopher/bin/blogidx.sh) > $(DESTDIR)/gopher/blog/index.gph .PHONY: clean clean: - rm -f $(BUILT) bin/fixlinks - + rm -f $(BUILT) # Individual files to build -jam-tuesday/stats: $(SETS) bin/jam-stats.sh - (date; echo; $(DIR)/bin/jam-stats.sh -f) > $@ - -jam-tuesday/index.html: $(SETS) bin/jam-index.sh bin/jam-stats.sh - $(DIR)/bin/jam-index.sh > $@ +gopher/jam-tuesday/stats: $(SETS) bin/jam-stats.sh + (date; echo; ./bin/jam-stats.sh -f) > $@ -index.html: - ln -sf intro.html index.html +www/jam-tuesday/index.html: $(SETS) bin/jam-index.sh bin/jam-stats.sh + ./bin/jam-index.sh > $@ -atom.xml: blog.7 bin/genatom.sh - $(DIR)/bin/genatom.sh > $@ - -bin/fixlinks: LINKS - mkdir -p bin - printf "#!/bin/sh\n# GENERATED DO NOT EDIT\nsed" > $@ - awk '{ printf " \\\n -e s#https://man.openbsd.org/%s#%s#g", $$1, $$2 } END { printf "\n" }' $(DIR)/LINKS >> $@ - chmod +x $@ +www/atom.xml: $(HTML) bin/genatom.sh + ./bin/genatom.sh > $@ gopher/notes/index.gph: $(NOTES) - (cd $(DIR)/gopher/notes && $(DIR)/gopher/bin/notetag) > $@ - -gopher.atom: $(PHLOG) gopher/bin/gophatom.sh - $(DIR)/gopher/bin/gophatom.sh > $@ + (cd gopher/notes && ../bin/notetag) > $@ -# Inference rules (*.txt and *.html) -$(HTML): bin/genpost.sh bin/fixlinks +gopher/phlog/atom.xml: $(PHLOG) gopher/bin/gophatom.sh + ./gopher/bin/gophatom.sh > $@ -.SUFFIXES: .7 .txt .html -.7.html: - @echo "mandoc -Thtml $<" - @mandoc -Tlint -Werror $< - @$(DIR)/bin/genpost.sh < $< > $@ +# Inference rules (*.txt -> *.html) +$(HTML): Makefile www/header.html www/footer.html bin/gencrumbs -.7.txt: - @echo "mandoc -Tascii $<" - @mandoc -Tlint -Werror $< - @mandoc -Tascii -Owidth=72 < $< | col -b > $@ +.SUFFIXES: .txt .html +.txt.html: + @echo "building $@" + @(cat www/header.html; \ + ./bin/gencrumbs $@; \ + nihdoc < $< ; \ + cat www/footer.html) > $@ diff --git a/ORDER b/ORDER @@ -1,18 +0,0 @@ -# file order for the text.alexkarle.com site -001-intro.txt -002-license.txt -003-uses.txt -004-jam-tuesday.txt -101-blog.txt -102-a-new-hope.txt -103-domain-names.txt -104-BLM.txt -105-self-hosted.txt -106-on-writing.txt -107-my-old-man.txt -108-use-feeds.txt -109-creative-coding.txt -110-text-only.txt -111-make-obj.txt -112-use-git.txt -113-burrowing.txt diff --git a/README.md b/README.md @@ -4,32 +4,25 @@ My small corner of the internet. www. ---- -A static site comprised of [mdoc(7)][mdoc] flavored man pages, built to -HTML via [mandoc(1)][mandoc] (managed by [make(1)][make]). +A small static blog powered by my own personal markup parser, [nihdoc]. -Currently hosted with OpenBSD's [httpd(8)][httpd], but any web server -should be able to serve it up. - -The Makefile to build the HTML is portable between gmake and BSD make. -On OpenBSD, running `make obj` is recommended before running `make` to -leverage the out-of-tree build extension (see the bit about `.OBJDIR` in -the man page!). +Currently hosted with OpenBSD's [httpd(8)], but any web server should be +able to serve it up. gopher:// --------- -A pure ascii dump of the [mdoc(7)][mdoc] content of the www site, served -over Gopher by [geomyidae(1)][geomyidae] respectively! +A pure ascii dump of the content of the www site, served over Gopher by +[geomyidae(1)] respectively! -Builds via [make(1)][make] at the same time as the HTML. See above for -instructions. +Builds via [make(1)] at the same time as the HTML. Also has gopher-exclusive content! git. ---- -I use a simple setup of git-daemon for anonymous (read-only) downloads, -ssh+git for read+write access (limited to myself) and -[stagit(1)][stagit] to host static views into the diffs and files of +I use a simple setup of [git-daemon(8)] for anonymous (read-only) downloads, +ssh+git for read+write access (limited to myself) and [stagit(1)] to +host static views into the diffs and files of each repo. I like the stagit approach in that it is simple, modular, and emphasizes @@ -38,19 +31,13 @@ etc). I use the default post-receive and create scripts that ship with the tool (with small modifications for the installation). The logo is in -this repo as logo.png. - -The content, being static, is served up with [httpd(8)][httpd] as well. - -I also discuss the setup in my blog posts [self-hosted(7)][self-hosted] -and [my-old-man(7)][my-old-man]. - -[mdoc]: https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7 -[mandoc]: https://man.openbsd.org/mandoc.1 -[make]: https://man.openbsd.org/make.1 -[httpd]: https://man.openbsd.org/httpd.8 -[stagit]: https://git.codemadness.org/stagit -[git-daemon]: https://git-scm.com/docs/git-daemon -[self-hosted]: https://alexkarle.com/self-hosted.html -[my-old-man]: https://alexkarle.com/my-old-man.html -[geomyidae]: http://r-36.net/scm/geomyidae +this repo as git/logo.png. + +The content, being static, is served up with [httpd(8)] as well. + +[make(1)]: https://man.openbsd.org/make.1 +[httpd(8)]: https://man.openbsd.org/httpd.8 +[stagit(1)]: https://git.codemadness.org/stagit +[git-daemon(8)]: https://git-scm.com/docs/git-daemon +[geomyidae(1)]: http://r-36.net/scm/geomyidae +[nihdoc]: https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/nihdoc diff --git a/a-new-hope.7 b/a-new-hope.7 @@ -1,22 +0,0 @@ -.Dd December 19, 2019 -.Dt A-NEW-HOPE 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm a-new-hope -.Nd cliche first blog post? -.Sh DESCRIPTION -Toying with the thought of starting a website/blog. -.Pp -Exploring my hosting options and pleasantly surprised that -.Lk https://fastmail.com FastMail -has free static site hosting! -.Pp -Inspired by Jeff Huang's article on websites Designed to Last -and a general desire for a simpler web. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Lk https://jeffhuang.com/designed_to_last -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El diff --git a/bin/genatom.sh b/bin/genatom.sh @@ -4,17 +4,13 @@ set -e REPO=$(dirname "$(dirname "$0")") -# Find fixlinks in either bin or the out-of-tree obj build -PATH="$REPO/bin:$REPO/obj/bin:$PATH" - -# All posts are a item (.It) in the list, and linked via .Xr -POSTS=$(sed '/SEE ALSO/q' "$REPO/blog.7" | grep -A1 '\.It' | grep '\.Xr' | sed 's/^\.Xr \([^ ]*\) 7/\1/') +POSTS=$(grep '^- ../..' "$REPO/www/blog/index.txt" | sed 's#.*/blog/\([^)]*\).*#\1#') cat <<HEADER <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom"> - <title>Alex Karle's blog(7)</title> - <link rel="alternate" type="text/html" href="https://alexkarle.com/blog.html"/> + <title>Alex Karle's blog</title> + <link rel="alternate" type="text/html" href="https://alexkarle.com/blog/index.html"/> <id>https://alexkarle.com/atom.xml</id> <link rel="self" type="application/atom+xml" href="https://alexkarle.com/atom.xml"/> <author> @@ -22,26 +18,30 @@ cat <<HEADER </author> HEADER -for p in $POSTS; do - d=$(date -juf"%b %d, %Y" +%F "$(grep '^\.Dd' "$REPO/$p.7" | cut -d' ' -f2-)") +for post in $POSTS; do + p=$(basename $post .html) + src="$REPO/www/blog/$p.txt" + [ "$p" = "index" ] && continue + + d=$(date -juf"%b %d, %Y" +%F \ + "$(grep '^_Published' "$src" | sed 's/_Published: \([^_]*\)_/\1/')") if [ -z "$printed_update" ]; then printed_update=1 printf " %s\n" "<updated>${d}T00:00:00Z</updated>" fi + + title=$(sed -e 's/^# //' -e '1q' "$src") cat <<ENTRY <entry> - <title>$p</title> - <link rel="alternate" type="text/html" href="https://alexkarle.com/$p.html"/> - <id>https://alexkarle.com/$p.html</id> + <title>$title</title> + <link rel="alternate" type="text/html" href="https://alexkarle.com/blog/$p.html"/> + <id>https://alexkarle.com/blog/$p.html</id> <updated>${d}T00:00:00Z</updated> <published>${d}T00:00:00Z</published> <content type="html"> <![CDATA[ ENTRY - # Print fragment (no need for escapes -- in CDATA - mandoc -Thtml -O'fragment,man=%N.html;https://man.openbsd.org/%N.%S' "$REPO/$p.7" \ - | sed '/<td class="head-vol">Miscellaneous Information Manual<\/td>/d' \ - | fixlinks + nihdoc < "$src" cat <<EOENTRY ]]> </content> diff --git a/bin/gencrumbs b/bin/gencrumbs @@ -0,0 +1,26 @@ +#!/bin/sh +# generate breadcrumbs +set -e +die() { + echo "$*" 1>&2 + exit 1 +} + +[ -z "$1" ] && die "usage: gencrumbs FILE" + +REPO=$(dirname "$(dirname "$(readlink -f "$0")")") +FILE=$(readlink -f "$1") + +rel=${FILE##$REPO/www} +parts=$(echo "$rel" | sed 's#/# #g') + +printf "<small><code><a href=\"/\">/home/alex</a>" +curr="" +for p in $parts; do + if [ "$p" = "index.html" ]; then + continue + fi + curr="$curr/$p" + printf " / <a href=\"$curr\">$p</a>" +done +echo "</code></small>" diff --git a/bin/genpost.sh b/bin/genpost.sh @@ -1,28 +0,0 @@ -#!/bin/sh -# genpost.sh -- reads mdoc(7) from stdin, generates HTML to stdout -REPO=$(dirname "$(dirname "$0")") - -# cd into $REPO so that the includes work! -cd $REPO - -# Find fixlinks in either bin or the out-of-tree obj build -PATH="$REPO/bin:$REPO/obj/bin:$PATH" - -# Command Explained -# ----------------- -# man=%N.html;man.openbsd.org -- look for files in CWD for .Xr, then link to openbsd.org -# sed: -# 1. Add a viewport tag for mobile -# 2. Add lang="en" to head for accessibility -# 3. Remove Misc Info column in header (too large on mobile) -# 4. Add a footer with license info -# 5. Correct various off-site links (i.e. .Xr st -> st.suckless.org instead of openbsd.org) -mandoc -Thtml -O 'man=%N.html;https://man.openbsd.org/%N.%S,style=style.css' \ - | sed \ - -e 's#</head>#<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1">&# ' \ - -e 's#^<html#& lang="en"#' \ - -e '/<td class="head-vol">Miscellaneous Information Manual<\/td>/d' \ - -e 's#</body>#<p class="foot-license">\ - © 2019-2021 Alex Karle | <a href="/">Home</a> | <a href="/license.html">License</a>\ -</p>\ -&#' | fixlinks diff --git a/bin/jam-index.sh b/bin/jam-index.sh @@ -1,7 +1,7 @@ #!/bin/sh set -e REPO=$(dirname "$(dirname "$0")") -DIR="$REPO/jam-tuesday" +DIR="$REPO/www/jam-tuesday" # Prep for the by artist listing ALL=$(mktemp) @@ -10,33 +10,73 @@ for f in "$DIR"/[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-*; do done | sort -f > "$ALL" cat <<EOM +<!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"/> -<link rel="stylesheet" href="/style.css" type="text/css" media="all"/> +<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"> +<!-- Inspired by https://www.swyx.io/css-100-bytes/ --> <style> -h1 { - font-size: 1.6em; - margin-top: 40px; +html { + max-width: 70ch; + padding: 3em 1em; + margin: auto; + font-size: 1em; + font-family: sans-serif; } -h2 { - font-size: 1.3em; - margin-top: 32px; - margin-bottom: 0; +footer { + margin-top: 50px; + font-size: .8em; } -h3 { - font-size: 1em; +code { font-family: consolas, courier, monospace; } +h1 { font-size: 1.5em; } +h2 { font-size: 1.2em; } +h3 { font-size: 1.1em; } +blockquote, code pre { + background: #f2f2f2; + overflow: auto; + padding: 10px; + border: 2px solid black; +} +.jam-artists tr:nth-child(even) { + background-color: #e3e3e3; +} +td.jam-artists, th.jam-artists, table.jam-artists { + border: 1px solid black; } </style> <title>Jam Tuesday Archive</title> -<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"> </head> <body> +<small><code><a href="/">/home/alex</a> / <a href="/jam-tuesday">jam-tuesday</a></code></small> <h1>Jam Tuesday Archive</h1> -<p>Welcome to the archive! For more information on the project, -refer to <a href="/jam-tuesday.html">jam-tuesday(7)</a>.</p> +<h2>About</h2> +<p> +From about October 2020 up until August 2021, my brother Matt and I +got together every Tuesday evening to play music. It started as a +way to stay sane during the COVID quarantine, but it quickly became +a tradition and a highlight of the week. No matter how stressful +work was, or what was going on in the outside world, we could leave +it all behind as we played some of our favorite tunes. +</p> +<p> +At some point (woefully late), I realized it would be fun to start +cataloging what we played. +</p> +<p> +This archive includes the setlists and some play stats. +</p> +<p> +There are no audio recordings (at least publicly), but there's a +stray note here and there to "set the scene". +</p> +<p> +The setlist notation is hopefully pretty straightforward. Unless +otherwise noted, I'm on guitar and Matt's on keys (and if only one +instrument is specified, it's me switching to it). We both +(attempt to) sing. Sometimes we even harmonize :) +</p> <h2>Stats</h2> -<hr> EOM "$REPO"/bin/jam-stats.sh | sed \ @@ -48,20 +88,18 @@ EOM cat <<EOM </ul> <h2>Setlists</h2> -<hr> Updated weekly: <ul> EOM for f in "$DIR"/[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-*; do name=$(basename "$f") - echo "<li><a href=\"$name\">$name</a></li>" + echo "<li><a href=\"/jam-tuesday/$name\">$name</a></li>" done cat <<EOM </ul> <h2>All Songs, by Artist</h2> -<hr> <table class="jam-artists"> <tr><th>Artist</th><th>Song</th><th>Plays</th></tr> EOM diff --git a/bin/jam-stats.sh b/bin/jam-stats.sh @@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ set -e N=10 REPO=$(dirname "$(dirname "$0")") -DIR="$REPO/jam-tuesday" +DIR="$REPO/www/jam-tuesday" TMP=$(mktemp) num_sessions=0 for set in "$DIR"/[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-*; do diff --git a/bin/newpost b/bin/newpost @@ -1,27 +0,0 @@ -#!/bin/sh -set -e -die() { - echo "$1" 1>&2 - exit 1 -} - -[ -z "$1" ] && die "usage: $(basename "$0") NAME" - -name="$1" -TITLE=$(printf "$name" | tr [a-z] [A-Z]) - -cat <<EOM > "$name".7 -.Dd $(date +"%B %d, %Y") -.Dt $TITLE 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm $name -.Nd <desc> -.Sh DESCRIPTION -entry -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El -EOM diff --git a/blog.7 b/blog.7 @@ -1,67 +0,0 @@ -.Dd $Mdocdate$ -.Dt BLOG 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm blog -.Nd yet another weblog -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I don't write frequently, but when I do, it's usually about tech. -.Pp -If you'd like to get notifications on new articles, I publish an -.Lk atom.xml Atom -feed (for use with your favorite RSS/Atom client). -.Pp -For an up to date list of software/hardware I use, see -.Xr uses 7 . -.Sh POSTS -.Bl -tag -width "XX/XX" -.It 11/21 -.Xr burrowing 7 -- from -.Xr text-only 7 -to gopher-only -.It 11/21 -.Xr use-git 7 -- non-standard uses of -.Xr git 1 -.It 09/21 -.Xr make-obj 7 -- out-of-tree builds with BSD -.Xr make 1 -.It 09/21 -.Xr text-only 7 -- announcing text.alexkarle.com -.It 07/21 -.Xr creative-coding 7 -- learning through creative limitation -.It 02/21 -.Xr use-feeds 7 -- RSS/Atom feeds; what, why, and how -.It 12/20 -.Xr my-old-man 7 -- Adventures in using -.Xr mdoc 7 -for this site -.It 10/20 -.Xr on-writing 7 -- On Writing Without an Audience -.It 07/20 -.Xr self-hosted 7 -- Migrating to a Self-Hosted Site -.It 07/20 -.Xr BLM 7 -- Black Lives Matter -.It 03/20 -.Xr domain-names 7 -- What's in a (domain) name? -.It 12/19 -.Xr a-new-hope 7 -- A New Hope -.El -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr intro 7 -.It -.Xr jam-tuesday 7 -.El diff --git a/burrowing.7 b/burrowing.7 @@ -1,113 +0,0 @@ -.Dd November 15, 2021 -.Dt BURROWING 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm burrowing -.Nd from -.Xr text-only 7 -to gopher-only -.Sh DESCRIPTION -This past month, -I've spent a lot of time learning about gopher. -It's truly a fascinating alternative to the world wide web, -not just in the content found there -but also in terms of the protocol itself. -.Pp -As of this writing, I've decided to deprecate -.Lk https://text.alexkarle.com -in favor of serving that content (and more!) over gopher -instead, exclusively. -.Sh IMPLICATIONS -This shouldn't have much impact on this -.Xr blog 7 . -After all, -.Xr text-only 7 -was an experiment to begin with! -I'll still keep publishing semi-regularly here, -I just don't plan on maintaining a text dump via HTTP. -.Pp -I will, however, start publishing gopher-only content. -There's two main reasons for this: -.Pp -.Bl -enum -compact -.It -I want to see more activity on gopher -.It -Gopher is easier to publish on -.El -.Pp -Admittedly, number 2 is my own doing. -I moved this blog to -.Xr mdoc 7 -willingly -.Xr ( my-old-man 7 ) -to learn the language. -I've found that it slows my raw output, -which, -while fine for longer form pieces, -is a pain for shorter-form thoughts. -No regrets (I learned a ton!), -but shorter-form thoughts do much better in plaintext! -.Pp -The first reason is a theme for this blog: -be the change you want to see. -I would love to see more content on gopher, -so I'm taking the plunge. -.Sh THE PITCH -So, why gopher? -Probably the biggest reason to explore gopher is -the content. -It's a parallel network totally untouched by -commercial interests. -You won't see a single ad. -.Pp -The second reason to try gopher lies in the -protocol itself--gopher has a standardized menu -interface, and individual gopherholes cannot -change the way you interact with them beyond -the standard. -In a world where it seems every bit of the -web's UI has been rewritten in JavaScript (looking -at you, <div>'s that should be <button>'s), -it's wildly refreshing -to just have a predictable menu. -.Pp -So, gopher separates the interaction (menus) -from the content (can be anything, but is usually -plaintext). -I think this is a cool design choice -because it emphasizes what the gopher protocol -is really about: fetching documents. -.Pp -Ultimately, -it's hard to describe and much better experienced. -For a quick dip, -try out a proxy like -.Lk https://gopherproxy.net . -For client recommendations, -I'd check out -.Xr lynx 1 , -.Xr sacc 1 , -or -.Xr bombadillo 1 . -Bombadillo has gemini support too, -gemini being another alternative internet protocol -worth checking out. -I'll likely put my stuff up there too, -if time allows. -.Pp -Not sure where to start in your client? -Go to -.Lk gopher://alexkarle.com -of course! :) -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Lk https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc1436 RFC 1436 (Gopher) -.It -.Lk http://gopherproject.org -.It -.Lk http://gemini.circumlunar.space Gemini official site -.El diff --git a/creative-coding.7 b/creative-coding.7 @@ -1,71 +0,0 @@ -.Dd July 18, 2021 -.Dt CREATIVE-CODING 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm creative-coding -.Nd learning through creative limitation -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I was talking to a friend recently about hobby coding -and ways to code creatively. -In the course of that conversation, -I was able to put a name to one of my favorite tactics: -creative limitation. -.Pp -A quick internet search seems to associate the term with Phil Hansen -and more traditional art, -but I think it applies nicely to coding too. -For example, -with this site, -I've chosen to restrict the tech stack to the OpenBSD base system. -It wasn't the initial goal (which was to learn -.Xr mdoc 7 ) , -but I quickly realized that restricting to base would give me -a better chance to learn base. -.Pp -Overall, I'd call it a success. -.Xr jam-tuesday 7 -gave me a chance to learn some -.Xr sh 1 -and -.Xr sed 1 , -.Xr blog 7 -was a chance to learn -.Xr mdoc 7 , -and the site's build system helped me brush up on BSD -.Xr make 1 . -.Pp -I'd encourage you to try it \(em -set an arbitrary restriction and see where it takes you! -Here's a few ideas to get you started: -.Pp -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -Write your own X window manager in as few lines of code as you can -.It -Write a version control system with -.Xr sh 1 , -.Xr diff 1 , -and -.Xr patch 1 -.It -Write a blogging engine updated via email -.It -Write your own templating language (and parser) -.El -.Pp -The goal, for me, is to choose a challenging project that helps -me understand a technology I use daily but may take for granted -(windowing systems, VCS, email, parsers, etc). -.Pp -Restricting size helps understand what the core definition of -a technology is. -Building clones can help teach edge cases and design decisions one -might otherwise overlook. -And in all cases, it's a good chance to learn a new language! -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Xr my-old-man 7 -.El diff --git a/domain-names.7 b/domain-names.7 @@ -1,41 +0,0 @@ -.Dd March 24, 2020 -.Dt DOMAIN-NAMES 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm domain-names -.Nd what's in a (domain) name? -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I went through a phase this week of really wanting `karle.[original-tld]`. -Not for a business. -Not for boosting my own webpage (it doesn't really have much traffic). -Just for me. -.Pp -The results were... disheartening. -.Ss karle.org -Registered since 2004, no website, just an email DNS record. -WHOIS guard ensures I can't even reach out to who owns it. -.Ss karle.com -For sale by owner on Uniregistry. -Ok. -Inquired. -Owner wants a "serious 5 figure offer". -Next! -.Ss karle.net -Owned by -.Lk https://realnames.com RealNames , -a business seemingly centered around buying lastname.net domains and -charging people like me to set up an email. -Almost brilliant enough of a business to make me forgive their scumminess. -.Em Almost . -Nary an option to buy it. -.Ss Conclusion -So here we are. -Looks like `karle.co` for at least a little longer. -.Pp -.Sy Update: -I've settled on alexkarle.com and plan to use it for the foreseeable future. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El diff --git a/logo.png b/git/logo.png Binary files differ. diff --git a/gopher/bin/blogidx.sh b/gopher/bin/blogidx.sh @@ -0,0 +1,7 @@ +#!/bin/sh +# generate the blog index +REPO=$(dirname "$(dirname "$(dirname "$0")")") +grep '^-' "$REPO/www/blog/index.txt" | \ + sed 's#- \(../..\) \[\([^]]*\)](/blog/\([^\.]*\).*#[0|\1 \2|\3.txt|server|port]#' + +printf "\n[1|<-- Home|/|server|port]\n" diff --git a/gopher/blog/index.gph b/gopher/blog/index.gph @@ -13,6 +13,7 @@ This is just a mirror of my WWW site: [h| https://alexkarle.com|URL:https://alexkarle.com|server|port] -Since the content really is mdoc(7), -it's fairly easy to mirror here :) +Since the content is written in a +fairly legible markup language, it's +easy to mirror here :) diff --git a/gopher/jam-tuesday/stats b/gopher/jam-tuesday/stats @@ -1,4 +1,4 @@ -Thu Nov 11 22:03:10 EST 2021 +Tue Dec 28 16:55:16 EST 2021 Play Stats: ----------- diff --git a/intro.7 b/intro.7 @@ -1,38 +0,0 @@ -.Dd $Mdocdate$ -.Dt INTRO 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm intro -.Nd welcome to my personal website -.Sh ABOUT ME -Hi! -I'm Alex. -I'm a software engineer living in the Boston area. -My current technical interests include operating systems, -version control, -and developer tooling, -but I'm constantly learning new tech that I get excited about. -Occasionally, I might write about it here on my -.Xr blog 7 . -.Pp -Outside of tech, I enjoy playing music, hiking, and a good board game -shared among friends. -.Pp -If you can't tell from the layout of this site, I'm a -.Xr man 1 -page enthusiast. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Lk https://euchre.live euchre(6) -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Xr jam-tuesday 7 -.It -.Xr uses 7 -.It -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com projects(7) -.El -.Sh CONTACT -Email: contact AT this-domain diff --git a/jam-tuesday.7 b/jam-tuesday.7 @@ -1,37 +0,0 @@ -.Dd $Mdocdate$ -.Dt JAM-TUESDAY 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm jam-tuesday -.Nd setlists and notes from weekly jams -.Sh DESCRIPTION -From about October 2020 up until August 2021, -my brother Matt and I got together every Tuesday evening to play music. -It started as a way to stay sane during the COVID quarantine, -but it quickly became a tradition and a highlight of the week. -No matter how stressful work was, -or what was going on in the outside world, -we could leave it all behind as we played some of our favorite tunes. -.Pp -At some point (woefully late), -I realized it would be fun to start cataloging what we played. -.Pp -The setlists and some play stats are all available in the -.Lk /jam-tuesday/ Jam Tuesday Archive . -.Pp -There are no audio recordings (at least publicly), -but there's a stray note here and there to "set the scene". -.Pp -The setlist notation is hopefully pretty straightforward. -Unless otherwise noted, -I'm on guitar and Matt's on keys -(and if only one instrument is specified, it's me switching to it). -We both (attempt to) sing. -Sometimes we even harmonize :) -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr intro 7 -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El diff --git a/jam-tuesday/index.html b/jam-tuesday/index.html @@ -1,255 +0,0 @@ -<html lang="en"> -<head> -<meta charset="utf-8"/> -<link rel="stylesheet" href="/style.css" type="text/css" media="all"/> -<style> -h1 { - font-size: 1.6em; - margin-top: 40px; -} -h2 { - font-size: 1.3em; - margin-top: 32px; - margin-bottom: 0; -} -h3 { - font-size: 1em; -} -</style> -<title>Jam Tuesday Archive</title> -<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"> -</head> -<body> -<h1>Jam Tuesday Archive</h1> -<p>Welcome to the archive! For more information on the project, -refer to <a href="/jam-tuesday.html">jam-tuesday(7)</a>.</p> -<h2>Stats</h2> -<hr> -<h3>Play Stats:</h3> -<ul> -<li> 19 Jam Sessions</li> -<li> 330 Songs Total</li> -<li> 159 Unique Songs</li> -<li> 87 Unique Artists</li> -</ul> -<h3>Top 10 Artists (Frequency, Name):</h3> -<ul> -<li> 40 The Front Bottoms</li> -<li> 37 Peach Pit</li> -<li> 29 Manchester Orchestra</li> -<li> 16 Vulfpeck</li> -<li> 16 Dr. Dog</li> -<li> 15 The Dear Hunter</li> -<li> 10 Atta Boy</li> -<li> 9 Cage The Elephant</li> -<li> 7 Lake Street Dive</li> -<li> 7 Her's</li> -</ul> -<h3>Top 10 Songs (Frequency, Name):</h3> -<ul> -<li> 12 Twin Size Mattress, The Front Bottoms</li> -<li> 11 Rhode Island, The Front Bottoms</li> -<li> 11 Alrighty Aphrodite, Peach Pit</li> -<li> 10 Shadow People, Dr. Dog</li> -<li> 10 Brian's Movie, Peach Pit</li> -<li> 8 The Beers, The Front Bottoms</li> -<li> 8 Jack and Blow, Atta Boy</li> -<li> 6 That I Miss You, Vansire</li> -<li> 6 Lauren, Men I Trust</li> -<li> 6 Drop the Guillotine, Peach Pit</li> -</ul> -<h2>Setlists</h2> -<hr> -Updated weekly: -<ul> -<li><a href="2021-03-09">2021-03-09</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-03-16">2021-03-16</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-03-23">2021-03-23</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-03-30">2021-03-30</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-04-06">2021-04-06</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-04-13">2021-04-13</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-04-20">2021-04-20</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-04-27">2021-04-27</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-05-04">2021-05-04</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-05-18">2021-05-18</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-05-25">2021-05-25</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-06-01">2021-06-01</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-06-08">2021-06-08</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-06-15">2021-06-15</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-06-22">2021-06-22</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-07-06">2021-07-06</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-07-13">2021-07-13</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-07-20">2021-07-20</a></li> -<li><a href="2021-07-27">2021-07-27</a></li> -</ul> -<h2>All Songs, by Artist</h2> -<hr> -<table class="jam-artists"> -<tr><th>Artist</th><th>Song</th><th>Plays</th></tr> -<tr><td>311</td><td>Amber</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>A Great Big Pile Of Leaves</td><td>Alligator Bop</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>A Tribe Called Quest</td><td>Can I Kick It?</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Anderson .Paak</td><td>Make It Better</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Anderson .Paak & Bruno Mars</td><td>Leave the Door Open</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Atta Boy</td><td>Jack and Blow</td><td>8</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Walden Pond</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Bad Books</td><td>Baby Shoes</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Forest Whitaker</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>It Never Stops</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The After Party</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>You Wouldn't Have To Ask</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Beck</td><td>Loser</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Cage The Elephant</td><td>Cigarette Daydreams</td><td>6</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Shake Me Down</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Telescope</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Trouble</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Cake</td><td>Comfort Eagle</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Carpenters</td><td>Close To You</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Carrie Underwood</td><td>Before He Cheats</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Daniel Caesar</td><td>Japanese Denim</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Darwin Deez</td><td>Radar Detector</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Death Cab For Cutie</td><td>I Will Posess Your Heart</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Dojo Cat</td><td>Say So</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Dr. Dog</td><td>Nellie</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Shadow People</td><td>10</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Stranger</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The Beers/Shadow People</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The Breeze</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Twin Size/Shadow People/Beers</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Eurythmics</td><td>Sweet Dreams</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Eve 6</td><td>Inside Out</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Father John Misty</td><td>Real Love Baby</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td>Fleet Foxes</td><td>White Winter Hymnal</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Foo Fighters</td><td>Learn To Fly</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The Pretender</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Goo Goo Dolls</td><td>Iris</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Gorillaz</td><td>Feel Good Inc.</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Harvey Danger</td><td>Flagpole Sitta</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Her's</td><td>Blue Lips</td><td>6</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Cool With You</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Herbie Hancock</td><td>Chameleon</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td>Jay Som</td><td>Baybee</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Jimmy Eat World</td><td>The Middle</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>John Mayer</td><td>Moving On and Getting Over</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>No Such Thing</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Joyce Manor</td><td>Last You Heard of Me</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Kanye West</td><td>Golddigger</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Kate Bollinger</td><td>I Don't Wanna Lose</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Kevin Devine</td><td>Cotton Crush</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>I Could Be With Anyone</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Khalid</td><td>Talk</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Lake Street Dive</td><td>Call Off Your Dogs</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Hello Goodbye</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Hypotheticals</td><td>5</td></tr> -<tr><td>Lenny Kravitz</td><td>Fly Away</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Mac DeMarco</td><td>My Old Man</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Mac Miller</td><td>What's The Use</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td>Manchester Orchestra</td><td>Bed Head</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Everything To Nothing</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>I Can Barely Breathe</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>I Can Feel A Hot One</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>I've Got Friends</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Keel Timing</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Pride</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Shake It Out</td><td>5</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Telepath</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The Only One</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Tony The Tiger</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Virgin</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Matt</td><td>Original</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td>Matt and Alex</td><td>Original</td><td>5</td></tr> -<tr><td>Men I Trust</td><td>Lauren</td><td>6</td></tr> -<tr><td>Michael Jackson</td><td>Beat It</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Billie Jean</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Modern Baseball</td><td>Tears Over Beers</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Modest Mouse</td><td>Float On</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Natalie Imbruglia</td><td>Torn</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>No Doubt</td><td>Don't Speak</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Omar Apollo</td><td>The Two of Us</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td>OutKast</td><td>Ms Jackson</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Paper Kites</td><td>Bloom</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Parcels</td><td>Tieduprightnow</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Peach Pit</td><td>Alrighty Aphrodite</td><td>11</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Black Licorice</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Brian's Movie</td><td>10</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Chagu's Sideturn</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Drop the Guillotine</td><td>6</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Peach Pit</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Shampoo Bottles</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Techno Show</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Tommy's Party</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Phish</td><td>Character Zero</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td>Portugal. The Man</td><td>Feel It Still</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Prawn</td><td>Why You Always Leave A Note</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Radiohead</td><td>Creep</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Rage Against The Machine</td><td>Killing in the Name</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Red Hot Chili Peppers</td><td>Can't Stop</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td>Ripe</td><td>Caralee</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Goon Squad</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Pretty Dirty</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Talk to the Moon</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Robbie Hunter Band</td><td>Que Paso?</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Sammy Rae</td><td>Jackie Onassis</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Kick It To Me</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Santana</td><td>Smooth</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Stone Temple Pilots</td><td>Interstate Love Song</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Sublime</td><td>Doin Time</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Sugar Ray</td><td>Every Morning</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>Sure Sure</td><td>Good Thing</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Tame Impala</td><td>The Less I Know The Better</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Beatles</td><td>I've Just Seen A Face</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>With a Little Help From My Friends</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Black Keys</td><td>Tighten Up</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Cars</td><td>Just What I Needed</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Dear Hunter</td><td>A Sua Voz</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Black Sandy Beaches</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Deny It All</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Girl</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Misplaced Devotion</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Progress/Therma</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Red Hands</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The Moon/Awake</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>What it Means to Be Alone</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Eagles</td><td>Hotel California</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Front Bottoms</td><td>Cough It Out</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Flashlight</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Jim Bogart</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Legit Tattoo Gun</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Rhode Island</td><td>11</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The Beers</td><td>8</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Twin Size Mattress</td><td>12</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>West Virginia</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Head and The Heart</td><td>Honeybee</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Lost In My Mind</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Rivers and Roads</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td>The Raconteurs</td><td>Steady As She Goes</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>The White Stripes</td><td>We're Going To Be Friends</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Theo Katzman</td><td>You Could Be President</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Third Eye Blind</td><td>Semi Charmed Life</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Three Doors Down</td><td>Kryptonite</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Tonic</td><td>If You Could Only See</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Twiddle</td><td>When it Rains it Poors</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>USERx</td><td>Headsick</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td>Vampire Weekend</td><td>Flower Moon</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Sunflower</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td>Vansire</td><td>That I Miss You</td><td>6</td></tr> -<tr><td>Vulfpeck</td><td>1612</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Animal Spirits</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Aunt Leslie</td><td>3</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Baby I Don't Know Oh Oh</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Back Pocket</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>LAX</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Love is a Beautiful Thing</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Outro</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>Wait For The Moment</td><td>4</td></tr> -<tr><td>Weezer</td><td>Buddy Holly</td><td>2</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>If You're Wondering If I Want You To</td><td>1</td></tr> -<tr><td></td><td>The World Has Turned and Left Me Here</td><td>1</td></tr> -</table> -<br><br> -<p style="font-size: 0.7em">Last Updated: Thu Nov 11 21:15:31 EST 2021</p> -<p class="foot-license"> -© 2019-2021 Alex Karle | <a href="/">Home</a> | <a href="/license.html">License</a> -</p> -</body> -</html> diff --git a/license.7 b/license.7 @@ -1,26 +0,0 @@ -.Dd $Mdocdate$ -.Dt LICENSE 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm license -.Nd copyright info for this site -.Sh COPYRIGHT -Except where otherwise noted, -all content on this site is licensed under a -Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (CC BY 4.0). -.Pp -Any code snippets, including the code used to build this site, -are licensed under a MIT license. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Lk https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ CC BY 4.0 -.It -.Lk /LICENSE MIT license -.It -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com Source code for the site -.It -.Xr intro 7 -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El diff --git a/make-obj.7 b/make-obj.7 @@ -1,156 +0,0 @@ -.Dd September 28, 2021 -.Dt MAKE-OBJ 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm make-obj -.Nd out-of-tree builds with BSD -.Xr make 1 -.Sh DESCRIPTION -If you've ever built parts of OpenBSD from source, -you may know that the sequence of commands recommended by -.Xr release 8 -is: -.Pp -.Bd -literal -offset indent -$ make obj -$ make -# make install -.Ed -.Pp -If, like me, you've forgotten the -.Ql make obj -step, -you'll find yourself with many derived files in the -current directory of whatever program you're building. -By running -.Ql make obj -first, -a directory called -.Pa obj -appears and the derived files -(usually -.Pa *.o -files) are placed there instead. -Cleverly, the -.Pa obj -directory is actually a symlink to -another filesystem under -.Pa /usr/obj , -making it truly an out-of-tree build. -.Pp -Up until recently, -I understood what the -.Ql obj -target did and why it was useful. -However, it wasn't until I tried to replicate it with the -build for text.alexkarle.com -that I discovered how it worked. -I figured I'd document it here in case it helps anyone else. -.Sh HOW IT WORKS -My discovery of the inner workings of this target was a classic -lesson in RTFM. -After 10-15 minutes of trying to parse the makefiles in -.Pa /usr/share/mk , -I finally searched for -.Pa obj -in the -.Xr make 1 -man page, -and sure enough the answer was the first hit! -I've copied it for convenience below -(licensed under the BSD-3 clause): -.Pp -.Bl -tag -offset indent -.It Va .OBJDIR -Path to the directory where targets are built. -At startup, -.Ic make -searches for an alternate directory to place target files. -.Ic make -tries to -.Xr chdir 2 into -.Ev MAKEOBJDIR -(or -.Pa obj -if -.Ev MAKEOBJDIR -is not defined), -and sets -.Va .OBJDIR -accordingly. -Should that fail, -.Va .OBJDIR -is set to -.Va .CURDIR . -.El -.Pp -With this new knowledge, -getting an out-of-tree build was almost as simple as running -.Ql mkdir obj -before -.Ql make ! -.Pp -The one catch was that, -having chdir'd in, -I had to canonicalize the paths to any scripts used in the build recipes. -For instance, -I have a genpost.sh script in the -.Pa bin/ -directory of this repo. -To call it from the -.Pa obj -directory, -I needed to use its absolute path via the -.Va .CURDIR -variable: -.Pp -.Dl $(.CURDIR)/bin/genpost.sh < $< > $@ -.Sh PORTABILITY -While I mostly build my site on OpenBSD, -it's important to me that it builds with GNU make too. -.Pp -Unfortunately, -the -.Va .OBJDIR -chdir'ing appears to be an extension in OpenBSD's -make (and possibly NetBSD too). -The good news is that, -with one more trick, -GNU make support is easy to add -(albeit without out-of-tree builds). -.Pp -The one final hack to support GNU make was to define -a portable version of -.Va .CURDIR . -Since -.Va .CURDIR -isn't defined in GNU make (which uses -.Va CURDIR -instead), -I had to define the -.Va DIR -variable that's the concatenation of the two: -.Pp -.Dl DIR = $(.CURDIR)$(CURDIR) -.Pp -.Sh CONCLUSION -I hope this sheds some light on why -.Ql make obj -is common practice on OpenBSD as well as -how to add similar support to your own projects! -.Pp -While not as flexible as GNU make's pattern matching -inference rules (that allow builds in subdirectories), -I find the chdir-ing into -.Pa obj -a cleverly simple way -to obtain a similar end result. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Xr text-only 7 -.It -.Xr my-old-man 7 -.El diff --git a/my-old-man.7 b/my-old-man.7 @@ -1,159 +0,0 @@ -.Dd December 30, 2020 -.Dt MY-OLD-MAN 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm my-old-man -.Nd adventures in using -.Xr mdoc 7 -as the markup for this site -.Sh SYNOPSIS -.Bd -literal -offset indent -Uh oh, -looks like, -I'm seeing more of my old man(1) in me - ~ Mac DeMarco (added (1) by me) -.Ed -.Sh DESCRIPTION -While Mac wasn't talking about good old roff-style man pages, -I felt his words were a fun description of my effort to move -from a markdown based templated site to a -.Xr mdoc 7 -based site. -.Pp -After pointing out that -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com/file/intro.7.html I really did -rewrite my site in -.Xr mdoc 7 , -you might be wondering -.Em why -I would do this. -This blog post is intended to answer just that. -.Sh WHY -.Ss For the learning experience -The single biggest motivator of the rewrite was that -I like to use this site as a playground for learning new (old) technology, -and -.Xr mdoc 7 -was on my list of tech to learn. -.Pp -What better way to learn a new markup language than to port an existing -project to use it? -.Pp -I had a blast transferring my old posts and coming up with a new build -system. -.Ss For the look -I really enjoy a good -.Xr man 1 -page. -.Pp -You've probably heard it before, but I'll say it again: one of the best -parts of using OpenBSD is its concise and comprehensive man pages in -the base system. -.Pp -There's a certain warm fuzzy feeling when you can learn something -both without internet access and with the knowledge that it is the -authoritative source. -.Pp -I want my site to be a homage to good, well thought out, -.Xr man 1 -pages. -.Ss Keeping it all in base -As an OpenBSD nerd, I find a bit of joy in having a site which is built, -deployed, and served all via the base OpenBSD system. -.Pp -By using -.Xr mandoc 1 -instead of Markdown.pl, I can now build my site without any additional -dependencies. -.Pp -Better yet, -.Xr mandoc 1 -is ported to the various Linux distros I use day to day, and it is -.Em fast . -.Sh HOW -If you read this far, I thought you might be interested to hear how I'm -deploying the content. -.Pp -I'm a big fan of automation, so I've rigged up the site to deploy on a push -to the master branch. -Doing so involved two steps. -.Ss Building the mdoc -I created a small Makefile that builds each HTML file from each man page source. -.Pp -The relevant bit is the implicit suffix rule to convert each .7 file to .html: -.Bd -literal -offset indent -\).SUFFIXES: .7 .html -\).7.html: - @echo "mandoc $<" - @mandoc -Thtml -O 'man=%N.html;https://man.openbsd.org/%N.%S,style=style.css' $< \\ - | sed 's#</head>#<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1">&# ' \\ - > $@ -.Ed -.Pp -This looks crazy, but it's not too complex. -First, know that -.Sy $< -is the source (the <name>.7 page), and -.Sy $@ -is the target (the <name>.html page). -The -.Sy @ -prefix is a bit of magic to suppress printing the command run (so that all the -output shown on git-push is just a single "mandoc" line for each file updated). -.Pp -Moving on to the mandoc command, I use the html output of mandoc via -T, -with the -O switch specifying that linked man-page references should look -locally first, then to point to man.openbsd.org. -This allows me to quickly reference OpenBSD base tools and pages, while also -using the terse -.Sy .Xr -macro for linking individual site pages. -.Pp -Finally, I use a -.Xr sed 1 -oneliner to splice in a <meta> viewport tag for mobile -devices. -.Pp -And that's really it! -The rest is just listing the man pages I want built, -with a phony default target depending on the html pages so that a -.Ql make -builds them all. -Check out the full source -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com/file/Makefile.html here . -.Ss Deploying via git hook -Since I'm self-hosting git on the same server as the website, it's trivial to -deploy when it receives a push by leveraging git hooks. -.Pp -For the unfamiliar, git hooks are simply shell scripts that are triggered by -specific git actions. -In this case, I used the post-receive hook to publish -after the refs were updated via a -.Ql git push . -.Pp -More specifically, I added the following to -.Pa <git-dir>/hooks/post-receive : -.Bd -literal -offset indent -echo "Deploying to to /var/www/htdocs... " -WT=/var/www/htdocs -git -C ${dir} --work-tree=${WT} checkout -f master -make -C ${WT} -echo "done" -.Ed -.Pp -So, on any push, it checks out the entire source tree into the webserver's content -area and rebuilds only the necessary HTML files (thanks to -.Xr make 1 ) . -.Pp -If I had files I didn't want served, I would modify it to build elsewhere and -copy the contents to /var/www; however, I'm publishing both the source for the site -and the git history at -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com , -so I don't see any harm to having the README.md accessible from the root. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Lk https://www.git-scm.com/docs/githooks git hooks -.El diff --git a/on-writing.7 b/on-writing.7 @@ -1,58 +0,0 @@ -.Dd October 22, 2020 -.Dt ON-WRITING 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm on-writing -.Nd thoughts on writing without an audience -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I wrote a blog post 3 weeks ago but never published it. -I spent a couple hours writing, proof-reading, and rewriting, and settled to -re-read once more in the morning and publish if I still liked it after a good -nights sleep. -.Pp -I got caught up with other things, and a day or two later re-read it and -still didn't end up publishing it. -I didn't think it was quite right. -I liked it well enough, but I was worried other people would judge it. -.Pp -But here's the irony -\(em -as far as I know, I have no readers. -Publishing it is almost equivalent to shouting into the void. -.Pp -So why did I care so much? -.Pp -As I found myself thinking about how I'd revise the original post -tonight, I realized that maybe this fear of judgment from non-existent -(but potential future) internet strangers was a much more interesting -topic to explore than my original musings. -So here I am hashing it out. -.Pp -I think the fear of judgment comes from a mixture of seeing public figures -have their pasts (preserved in the digital era) come back to haunt them -combined with observing how readers can react strongly and negatively to -posts. -I don't plan to ever become so famous as to have a blog haunt me, -nor do I ever expect enough readers to have overwhelmingly unpleasant -reactions, but the fear still got to me. -.Pp -But I want to persevere, and that's ultimately what writing this is about. -I'm not writing for fame or attention. -I'm not writing to further my career or put it on my resume. -I'm writing for me. -For the clarity I get from expressing my thoughts, and for -the joy I get looking back at where I was months or years ago. -.Pp -Why host them publicly? -Well, I really enjoy a good tech blog, and admire a blogger or two out there. -I want to be the change I want to see in the internet and migrate from -centralized social networks back to a decentralized network of personal and -self-hosted sites. -.Pp -And who knows, maybe one day someone will read this and have felt the same. -I guess I'm writing for that person too. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.El diff --git a/self-hosted.7 b/self-hosted.7 @@ -1,98 +0,0 @@ -.Dd July 19, 2020 -.Dt SELF-HOSTED 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm self-hosted -.Nd a tale of migrating to my own server -.Sh DESCRIPTION -If you look at the first post -.Xr ( a-new-hope 7 ) -on this site, you'll see that this site started as a series of static HTML -files that I was, by hand, uploading to Fastmail via their "files" GUI. -.Pp -Being a total nerd for automation, I was always on the lookout for an excuse to -migrate to my own server, where I could (over)engineer a pipeline to build my -static content and deploy it without ever leaving the terminal. -.Pp -That excuse presented itself in the form of needing to get a VPS to stand up my -hobby-project, `euchre.live`. -If I was going to pay for a tiny VM, it was a no-brainer to move my personal -site to it too. -.Pp -This turned out to be a great learning experience -\(em -getting hands on experience -with reverse proxies, DNS, and a variety of operating systems and webservers -(first hosted on Alpine Linux and migrated to OpenBSD). -Additionally, I could self-host git repos, which has long been a nerd-goal of mine :) -.Pp -I plan to write a lengthier post about the joys of self-hosting in the future, -but for now, I really just wanted to give a brief update on where I landed and -what the current stack is. -.Pp -I'm currently running (in no particular order): -.Pp -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Sy OS : -OpenBSD -.It -.Sy Web server : -OpenBSD's -.Xr httpd 8 -.Bl -dash -compact -.It -Serves the `www.` static content -.It -Also serves -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com -.El -.It -.Sy Reverse proxy : -OpenBSD's -.Xr relayd 8 -.Bl -dash -compact -.It -Used to send traffic between `euchre.live` (which uses a Mojolicious -web server as the backend) and `alexkarle.com` based on URL -.El -.It -.Sy `www` content : -.Bl -dash -compact -.It -100% static content -.It -No metrics, ads, or tracking -.It -Posts and pages written in markdown -.It -HTML generated with a pipeline of the original `Markdown.pl` into a small -templating Perl script that I home-rolled -.El -.It -.Sy Git : -.Bl -dash -compact -.It -Public repos served with -.Xr git-daemon 1 -over the `git://` protocol -.It -Push access via the `ssh://` protocol -.It -static HTML of content generated via post-receive hook with -.Xr stagit 1 -.El -.El -.Pp -That's all for now! -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Xr a-new-hope 7 -.It -.Lk https://euchre.live -.It -.Lk https://mojolicious.org Mojolicious -.El diff --git a/style.css b/style.css @@ -1,90 +0,0 @@ -/* general defaults */ -body { - background-color: #F5F5F5; - margin-left: 20px; - margin-right: 20px; - font-size: 1.3em; - line-height: 1.3; - font-family: monospace; -} - -/* style tweaks */ -a:link { color: #0a7899; } -a:visited { color: #033a4a; } -code { font-size: 1em; } -h1 { font-size: 1.1em; } -h2 { font-size: 1em; } -.foot-license { - margin-top: 16px; - font-size: .7em; - position: static; - bottom: 0; -} - -/* override bold/italic colors within permalinks */ -a.permalink { text-decoration: none } -b,i { color: #000000 } - -/* Responsive screen sizes */ -@media only screen and (min-width: 992px) { - body { - width: 60%; - margin: 0 auto; - } -} -@media only screen and (min-width: 600px) and (max-width: 991px) { - body { - width: 80%; - margin: 0 auto; - } -} - -/* Smaller font on small screens */ -@media only screen and (max-width: 599px) { - body { font-size: 1.1em; } -} - -/* margins around head/foot */ -table.foot { margin-top: 3em; } -table.head { margin-bottom: 3em; } - -/* scrollbars on the block-display content */ -div.Bd-indent { - border-left-color: gray; - border-left-style: solid; - border-left-width: 2px; - border-radius: 5px; - padding-left: 1em; -} - -.Bd > pre { - overflow-x: auto; -} - -/* Bl-tag correctly with grid for blog.7 */ -dl.Bl-tag { - display: grid; - grid-template-columns: max-content auto -} -dl.Bl-tag dd { - margin-left: 16px; - margin-bottom: 1em; -} - -/* defaults from mandoc(1)'s inlined CSS */ -table.head, table.foot { width: 100%; } -td.head-rtitle, td.foot-os { text-align: right; } -.Nd, .Bf, .Op { display: inline; } -.Pa, .Ad { font-style: italic; } -.Ms { font-weight: bold; } -.Bl-diag > dt { font-weight: bold; } -code.Nm, .Fl, .Cm, .Ic, code.In, .Fd, .Fn, .Cd { - font-weight: bold; -} - -.jam-artists tr:nth-child(even) { - background-color: #e3e3e3; -} -td.jam-artists, th.jam-artists, table.jam-artists { - border: 1px solid black; -} diff --git a/text-only.7 b/text-only.7 @@ -1,89 +0,0 @@ -.Dd September 20, 2021 -.Dt TEXT-ONLY 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm text-only -.Nd announcing text.alexkarle.com -.Sh DESCRIPTION -This past week I rolled out -.Lk https://text.alexkarle.com , -and I wanted to write a little bit about it! -.Ss WHAT -text.alexkarle.com is a text-only ascii dump of this entire site. -It's served over HTTP, HTTPS, and Gopher to provide a wide array -of options for accessing the content. -.Ss WHY -I'm a huge fan of the "small internet" and lightweight sites in general. -Although I'm not an active participant in any of the tilde communities, -I really appreciate the commitment to plaintext, *NIX, and simple software. -.Pp -At some point in my browsing of the tildeverse, -I stumbled across Gopher and took a liking to the simple protocol. -Surfing gopherspace is so awesomely fast and simple compared to -the slow, ad-filled, modern web. -Better yet, it's totally removed from the commercialization of the internet. -No one is serving content on Gopher to make money. -It's full of art and real, empathetic, humans. -.Pp -For my own part, -I started serving an ascii dump of the -.Xr mdoc 7 -content on this site over Gopher (via -.Xr gophernicus 8 ) -almost 7 months ago. -However, I was never really happy with how it was organized or generated -(hence the lack of an announcement on the -.Xr blog 7 ) . -.Pp -It was the discovery of a fellow -.Xr mdoc 7 -website over at -.Lk https://text.causal.agency -that inspired me to revisit my approach to publishing a text-only -version of this site. -I finally replaced the scripted afterthought of a gopher -publisher with a first class build target -and decided to expand the offering from gopher-only to HTTP(S). -I figured someone might prefer to browse it that way -(maybe retro computing enthusiasts?), -and with -.Xr httpd 8 -already running, it came basically for free! -.Ss HOW -I started to write about all the "challenges" I faced in this process, -but really these were all self-imposed problems from restricting myself -to a POSIX subset of BSD -.Xr make 1 -(in the name of -.Xr creative-coding 7 ) . -I think had I chosen either BSD make with extensions or GNU make, -the build would have been much cleaner, -but with a couple of hacks it's okay as is. -.Pp -Maybe I'll write about it someday, -but it didn't feel worth holding up this "announcement". -The TL;DR: I added another inference rule for *.7 -> *.txt and -moved from a "build in tree" model (where the source tree was what was served by -.Xr httpd 8 ) -to a "run the install target after build" model. -The latter is necessary because POSIX inference rules only build into the -current directory and I don't want text.alexkarle.com users to see the *.html -there too. -.Pp -Of course, if you're curious to see how the bits come together, -I publish all of the site source at -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com ! -.Sh UPDATE -As of November 15, 2021, text.alexkarle.com was moved entirely to gopher. -See -.Xr burrowing 7 -for more info. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Xr my-old-man 7 -.It -.Xr gophernicus 8 -.El diff --git a/use-feeds.7 b/use-feeds.7 @@ -1,142 +0,0 @@ -.Dd February 9, 2021 -.Dt USE-FEEDS 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm use-feeds -.Nd RSS/Atom feeds; what are they and why you should care -.Sh SYNOPSIS -.Bd -literal -offset indent -Feed the birds -Tuppence, a bag - ~ Mary Poppins -.Ed -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I've always wanted this site to be an homage to tech that I -enjoy using, and recently, that's included old-school RSS/Atom feeds. -However, up until now, I had only been a feed consumer -and had never produced my own. -So, this past weekend I decided to hunker down and read enough -of the spec to generate one for this site. -.Pp -But let's back up \(em what is a feed? Why should you care? -.Pp -A feed is simply a standardized listing of items a source -(blog, vlog, newspaper, etc) has generated recently. -Users then consume multiple feeds to get centralized notifications -on new content. -Think "following" on social media, but generalized for any content -accessible on the web. -.Pp -The most important feature of a feed is that it has been standardized -and is not controlled by any individual corporation. -This ensures that users are not only free from vendor lock-in, but -it also allows for an increasingly diverse set of clients and sources. -.Pp -For example, there are clients ranging from FOSS text only terminal -clients like -.Xr newsboat 1 -to commercial apps like -.Lk https://feedly.com Feedly . -And despite being drastically different UI's, their purpose is the same: -allow you to subscribe to any number of feeds, and centralize your -notifications. -.Pp -The idea is simple, but it's transformed the way I interact with the -web. -It saves me time in not browsing the infinite scroll that has -become social media, and it allows me to stay up to date with smaller -blogs that don't post frequently (cough, like yours truly, cough). -.Pp -Consider a new blog post on this site. -Without a feed, you'd have to periodically check my -.Xr blog 7 -for updates -or hear about it through some other link aggregation or social media -site (Hackernews, Reddit, etc). -Adding a feed allows those who want to follow to get notifications, without -checking other locations or having to waste time checking back periodically. -.Pp -So if you haven't tried a feed reader ever, go find one that suits -your fancy and give it a try! -In an era where user upvoted content reigns king (Reddit, Facebook, etc), -it's really empowering as a user to decide -.Em what -you see updates for and to be able to check them on your own time. -And if you're a publisher of any content, consider creating a feed for -others to follow. -I'll certainly appreciate it! -.Pp -It's never too late to take control of your digital habits, -and using a feed reader is a good place to start. -.Sh IMPLEMENTATION -If you read this far, I thought you might also be interested in hearing -not only the what and the why but also the -.Em how . -.Pp -Due to the recent migration to using -.Xr mdoc 7 -as the markup for this site (detailed in -.Xr my-old-man 7 ) , -I knew that finding an off-the-shelf feed generator would be unlikely. -Plus, with my general desire to keep the site build-able by base OpenBSD, -I figured it was as good an excuse as any to read the spec and generate -it myself. -.Pp -I ended up choosing Atom over RSS mostly based on some online opinions -that it is a stricter standard, but I can't say much to back that up. -What I can say is that after the initial confusion of how to escape the -embedded HTML in the XML feed, it was pretty smooth sailing. -.Pp -The full implementation is in -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com/file/bin/genatom.sh.html genatom.sh -and basically boils down to: -.Pp -.Bl -enum -compact -.It -.Xr grep 1 -call through the -.Em blog.7 -file to get a list of entries and their dates -.It -Print the header of the XML (with newest date from 1.) -.It -For each item in entries, add the XML entry along with the content -as generated by -.Xr mandoc 1 -with the -.Fl O Ar fragment -option. -This ensures the "notification" has the full post \(em -users never even need to visit the site! -.It -End by printing the footer of the XML -.El -.Pp -And that's it! -The only real trick was to use -.Lk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CDATA CDATA -sections around the entry content in the XML to escape the HTML tags. -.Pp -And of course, like everything else in this blog, it rebuilds on git-push -via a call to -.Xr make 1 . -See the -.Lk https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com/file/Makefile.html Makefile -for the recipe. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -My Atom feed: -.Lk https://alexkarle.com/atom.xml -.It -Wiki page on Atom: -.Lk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_(Web_standard) -.It -Atom RFC: -.Lk https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4287 -.It -Related advocacy: -.Lk https://atthis.link/blog/2021/rss.html -.El diff --git a/use-git.7 b/use-git.7 @@ -1,141 +0,0 @@ -.Dd November 07, 2021 -.Dt USE-GIT 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm use-git -.Nd non-standard uses for -.Xr git 1 -.Sh DESCRIPTION -In this post, -I'm not going to teach you how to use -.Xr git 1 . -Instead, -I wanted to write a quick post to encourage you to use git -for non-conventional use cases -(i.e. things other than source code). -.Pp -If perchance you're not familiar with git, -there's a ton of good documentation out there. -I'd recommend starting with the official and free -.Lk https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2 Pro Git . -Also, -as a PSA, -just know that git stores whole snapshots and NOT diffs. -.Pp -.Sh BACKGROUND -Git is a distributed version control system, -and this is a beautiful thing. -I feel it's often lost on us, -given that we use it most frequently on centralized forges -for team collaboration (GitHub, GitLab, etc). -.Pp -Git being distributed means you can: -.Pp -.Bl -enum -compact -.It -Use it offline (your copy is "first class") -.It -Mirror it to as many places as you want -.El -.Pp -In other words, -git can be used without any dependence on a third-party -service or company and with complete ownership of private data. -Forges (and I recommend -.Lk https://sourcehut.org ) -are a great place to backup your code and collaborate, -but you don't have to use a forge to use git as a futureproof way to do what -it does best: version your files. -.Sh STORY TIME -When I started my first job in tech, -I found that it was a good habit to take personal notes. -It was incredibly useful to quickly reference obscure CLI -commands or system knowledge gained from pairing. -These were things that were too small or personal to make it into -standard documentation -but invaluable to have on hand. -.Pp -My first solution was shoving them all into a directory called -.Pa ~/notes -as plaintext files. -They were easy to write and reference, -and it was simple to back them up by copying the directory -to another drive nightly. -.Pp -Over time, -the -.Ql cp -a -trick broke down: -.Pp -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -Files deleted in the source prevailed in the backup -.It -Changes more than a day old were lost! -.El -.Pp -Around the same time, -I started getting more familiar with git, -and it finally occurred to me: -I could use git and still keep these notes private! -.Pp -Git can clone/push/pull across filesystems, -so in the matter of minutes I solved both of my issues -with just: -.Bd -literal -offset indent -# Set up the backup mirror -$ git init --bare /backup/drive/notes.git - -# Put it to use! -$ cd ~/notes -$ git init && git add . && git commit -m "import" -$ git remote add origin /backup/drive/notes.git -$ git push -u origin main -.Ed -.Pp -If you don't have a backup drive mounted, -it's equally good (or better) to make the remote a repo -accessed over SSH: -.Bd -literal -offset indent -# On the remote host -user@example.com~$ git init --bare ~/notes.git - -# On the local host -$ git remote add origin user@example.com:notes.git -.Ed -.Sh GOING FURTHER -These days, -I shudder at the thought of any important plaintext on my system -that's not version-controlled somewhere. -Too many hours are spent writing these little files, -and it's so easy to version them, -why risk losing any of that history? -.Pp -Aside from my private notes, I version: -.Pp -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -System config files from /etc -.It -Personal config files (dotfiles) -.It -My passwords (via -.Xr pass 1 ) -.It -A small set of personal patches for FOSS projects I have yet to polish and upstream (a-la ports-system) -.It -My resume (admittedly still a DOCX from college, but versioning has really helped) -.El -.Pp -In conclusion, -my advice to anyone writing anything of importance: -just use -.Xr git 1 ! -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Lk https://github.blog/2020-12-17-commits-are-snapshots-not-diffs/ Commits are snapshots, not diffs -by Derrick Stolee -.El diff --git a/uses.7 b/uses.7 @@ -1,129 +0,0 @@ -.Dd September 14, 2021 -.Dt USES 7 -.Os -.Sh NAME -.Nm uses -.Nd list of software/hardware I use -.Sh DESCRIPTION -I really enjoy a good "uses" post. -I think the first I ever stumbled across was Wes Bos', -back when I was learning web-development. -As someone fascinated by developer tooling, -I loved hearing what other programmers use in their day-to-day lives. -.Pp -I try to keep this page up to date, -both for my future nostalgia -as well as for anyone else out there who enjoys the "genre". -.Sh SOFTWARE -.Ss Editor -I got hooked on -.Xr vim 1 -mid-college (~2017) and never looked back. -It's first on this list (with a dedicated section!) -because it was the "gateway program" -that got me interested in developer tooling in the first place! -If not my most important tool, -it's definitely the most impactful. -.Pp -Other editors I use: -.Pp -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr vi 1 -for system configs (super snappy on OpenBSD) -.It -.Xr ed 1 -for fun and for slow/serial connections (yes, really!) -.El -.Pp -I try emacs every once and a while because I think Lisp is awesome -(and far superior to VimScript), -but I don't really dig the "run everything in emacs" approach. -.Ss Operating System -I've been passionate about running free and open source (FOSS) -operating systems -since ~2019 when I first started using Linux seriously at work. -At some point in ~2020, I discovered OpenBSD and -slowly started putting it on all of my personal machines. -I'm currently running: -.Pp -.Bl -compact -bullet -.It -OpenBSD for my laptop, desktop, -server (hosting this site \(em see -.Xr self-hosted 7 ) , -and home router/firewall -.It -Arch Linux for work -(needed a cutting edge kernel for newer work laptop) -.El -.Pp -In the past I've also used Alpine Linux on my laptop and Debian -on my desktop. -.Ss Other Tools -I'm a huge fan of command line tools for their composability and -keyboard-centric UI. Some of my favorites include: -.Pp -.Bl -compact -bullet -.It -.Xr git 1 -for all things plaintext: notes, code, config backups, etc -.It -.Xr tmux 1 -for terminal scrollback, searching, copy/paste buffers, multiplexing, -persistent sessions over dropped -.Xr ssh 1 -connections... really a necessity! -.It -.Xr mutt 1 -for personal email (great for mailing lists!) -.It -.Xr pass 1 -for password/secret management -.It -.Xr sh 1 -for glueing it all together, of course! -.El -.Sh HARDWARE -.Ss Keyboard -After years of mushy laptop keyboards, -I discovered mechanical keyboards through a coworker and -I've been clicking and clacking happily ever since! -.Pp -I started off with an Ultimate Hacking Keyboard -with Kailh browns (had to be quiet in a shared office), -but I've been using a Keyboardio Atreus for about a year. -I switched in a (successful!) attempt to reduce finger movement -and strain. -Plus, I'm a remote worker now, -and I get to clack away at Kailh white switches, -which is awesome. -.Ss Laptop -When I started really getting into Linux at work and home ~2019, -I installed Arch on my old macbook and suffered at the hands of -NVIDIA and poor hardware support until I ditched my macbook for -a ThinkPad X220 (2011, i7, 2GB RAM) that I bought used for ~$130 off Ebay. -A simple upgrade to a SSD and it runs great! -.Pp -I use the laptop for casual browsing and hobby coding -(I try to ensure my hobby projects all run on old hardware!), -but its CPU age really shows on big websites or compilations. -.Ss Desktop -I built my first desktop (a long standing nerd goal of mine) at the -start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 when it became clear I'd be -working from home and my 2GB of laptop RAM wouldn't cut it. -.Pp -I tried (and failed) to keep the parts entirely FOSS-friendly, -but I ended up getting a GPU that needed the AMDGPU firmware blobs -(hard to find a fully free graphics card these days it seems). -With a high-end CPU (AMD Ryzen 7 3700X) -but a low-end GPU (Radeon RX 560), -it was a reasonable price. -And with 16GB of RAM, it handles my work environment well. -.Sh SEE ALSO -.Bl -bullet -compact -.It -.Xr blog 7 -.It -.Lk https://wesbos.com/uses Wes Bos' uses page -.El diff --git a/www/LICENSE b/www/LICENSE @@ -0,0 +1 @@ +../LICENSE +\ No newline at end of file diff --git a/www/blog/BLM.txt b/www/blog/BLM.txt @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +# Black Lives Matter + +_Published: July 13, 2020_ + +I meant to post about this earlier, but it's better late than +never. + +It's become abundantly clear to me that we need serious structural +changes in our country. I want to raise my voice in solidarity to +say that [Black Lives Matter](https://blacklivesmatter.com). + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/a-new-hope.txt b/www/blog/a-new-hope.txt @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +# A New Hope + +_Published: December 19, 2019_ + +Toying with the thought of starting a website/blog. + +Exploring my hosting options and pleasantly surprised that +[FastMail](https://fastmail.com) has free static site hosting! + +Inspired by [Jeff Huang's article](https://jeffhuang.com/designed_to_last) +on websites Designed to Last and a general desire for a simpler web. + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/burrowing.txt b/www/blog/burrowing.txt @@ -0,0 +1,78 @@ +# burrowing: From text-only to gopher-only + +_Published: November 15, 2021_ + +## Description + +This past month, I've spent a lot of time learning about gopher. +It's truly a fascinating alternative to the world wide web, not +just in the content found there but also in terms of the protocol +itself. + +As of this writing, I've decided to deprecate text.alexkarle.com +in favor of serving that content (and more!) over gopher instead, +exclusively. + +## Implications + +This shouldn't have much impact on this blog. After all, +text.alexkarle.com was [an experiment](/blog/text-only.html) to begin +with! I'll still keep publishing semi-regularly here, I just +don't plan on maintaining a text dump via HTTP. + +I will, however, start publishing gopher-only content. There's two +main reasons for this: + +1. I want to see more activity on gopher +2. Gopher is easier to publish on + +Admittedly, number 2 is my own doing. I +[moved this blog to `mdoc(7)`](/blog/my-old-man.html) willingly to +learn the language. I've found that it slows my raw output, +which, while fine for longer form pieces, is a pain for +shorter-form thoughts. No regrets (I learned a ton!), but +shorter-form thoughts do much better in plaintext! + +The first reason is a theme for this blog: be the change you want +to see. I would love to see more content on gopher, so I'm taking +the plunge. + +## The Pitch + +So, why gopher? Probably the biggest reason to explore gopher is +the content. It's a parallel network totally untouched by +commercial interests. You won't see a single ad. + +The second reason to try gopher lies in the protocol itself--gopher +has a standardized menu interface, and individual gopherholes +cannot change the way you interact with them beyond the standard. +In a world where it seems every bit of the web's UI has been +rewritten in JavaScript (looking at you, <div>'s that should be +<button>'s), it's wildly refreshing to just have a predictable +menu. + +So, gopher separates the interaction (menus) from the content (can +be anything, but is usually plaintext). I think this is a cool +design choice because it emphasizes what the gopher protocol is +really about: fetching documents. + +Ultimately, it's hard to describe and much better experienced. +For a quick dip, try out a proxy like [https://gopherproxy.net]. +For client recommendations, I'd check out +[`lynx(1)`](https://lynx.invisible-island.net/), +[`sacc(1)`](https://git.fifth.space/sacc), or +[`bombadillo(1)`](https://bombadillo.colorfield.space/). +Bombadillo has gemini support too, gemini being another +alternative internet protocol worth checking out. I'll likely put +my stuff up there too, if time allows. + +Not sure where to start in your client? Go to [gopher://alexkarle.com] +of course! :) + +## See Also + +- [RFC 1436 (Gopher)](https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc1436) +- [http://gopherproject.org] +- [Gemini official site](https://gemini.circumlunar.space) + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/creative-coding.txt b/www/blog/creative-coding.txt @@ -0,0 +1,44 @@ +# Learning Through Creative Limitation + +_Published: July 18, 2021_ + +I was talking to a friend recently about hobby coding and ways to +code creatively. In the course of that conversation, I was able to +put a name to one of my favorite tactics: creative limitation. + +A quick internet search seems to associate the term with Phil +Hansen and more traditional art, but I think it applies nicely to +coding too. For example, with this site, I've chosen to restrict +the tech stack to the OpenBSD base system. It wasn't the initial +goal (which was to learn mdoc(7)), but I quickly realized that +restricting to base would give me a better chance to learn base. + +Overall, I'd call it a success. The [Jam Tuesday](/jam-tuesday) +setlist project gave me a chance to learn some +[sh(1)](https://man.openbsd.org/sh.1) and +[sed(1)](https://man.openbsd.org/sed.1), and my [blog](.) +was a [chance to learn mdoc(7)](/blog/my-old-man.html), +and the site's build system helped me brush up on BSD +[make(1)](https://man.openbsd.org/make.1). + +I'd encourage you to try it -- set an arbitrary restriction and see +where it takes you! Here's a few ideas to get you started: + +- Write your own X window manager in as few lines of code as you can +- Write a version control system with + [sh(1)](https://man.openbsd.org/sh.1), + [diff(1)](https://man.openbsd.org/diff.1), and + [patch(1)](https://man.openbsd.org/sh.1) +- Write a blogging engine updated via email +- Write your own templating language (and parser) + +The goal, for me, is to choose a challenging project that helps me +understand a technology I use daily but may take for granted +(windowing systems, VCS, email, parsers, etc). + +Restricting size helps understand what the core definition of a +technology is. Building clones can help teach edge cases and +design decisions one might otherwise overlook. And in all cases, +it's a good chance to learn a new language! + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/domain-names.txt b/www/blog/domain-names.txt @@ -0,0 +1,38 @@ +# What's in a (Domain) Name + +_Published: March 24, 2020_ + +I went through a phase this week of really wanting +`karle.[original-tld]`. Not for a business. Not for boosting my +own webpage (it doesn't really have much traffic). Just for me. + +The results were... disheartening. + +*karle.org* + +Registered since 2004, no website, just an email DNS record. WHOIS +guard ensures I can't even reach out to who owns it. + +*karle.com* + +For sale by owner on Uniregistry. Ok. Inquired. Owner wants a +"serious 5 figure offer". Next! + +*karle.net* + +Owned by [RealNames](https://realnames.com), a business seemingly +centered around buying lastname.net domains and charging people +like me to set up an email. Almost brilliant enough of a business +to make me forgive their scumminess. _Almost._ Nary an option to +buy it. + + +## Conclusion + +So here we are. Looks like `karle.co` for at least a little +longer. + +*Update:* I've settled on alexkarle.com and plan to use it for the +foreseeable future. + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/index.txt b/www/blog/index.txt @@ -0,0 +1,33 @@ +# yet another weblog + +## About + +I don't write frequently, but when I do, it's usually about tech. + +If you'd like to get notifications on new articles, I publish an +[Atom feed](/atom.xml) (for use with your favorite RSS/Atom client). + +For an up to date list of software/hardware I use, see +[my "uses" page](/uses.html). + +## 2021 + +- 12/28 [Writing a Custom Markup Parser for this Site](/blog/mdoc-to-nihdoc.html) +- 11/21 [From text-only to gopher-only](/blog/burrowing.html) +- 11/21 [Some Non-Standard Uses of `git(1)`](/blog/use-git.html) +- 09/21 [Out-of-tree Builds with `BSD make(1)`](/blog/make-obj.html) +- 09/21 [Announcing text.alexkarle.com](/blog/text-only.html) +- 07/21 [Learning Through Creative Limitation](/blog/creative-coding.html) +- 02/21 [RSS/Atom feeds; What, Why, and How](/blog/use-feeds.html) + +## 2020 + +- 12/20 [Adventures in Using `mdoc(7)` for This Site](/blog/my-old-man.html) +- 10/20 [On Writing Without an Audience](/blog/on-writing.html) +- 07/20 [Migrating to a Self-Hosted Site](/blog/self-hosted.html) +- 07/20 [Black Lives Matter](/blog/BLM.html) +- 03/20 [What's in a (Domain) Name?](/blog/domain-names.html) + +## 2019 + +- 12/19 [A New Hope](/blog/a-new-hope.html) diff --git a/www/blog/make-obj.txt b/www/blog/make-obj.txt @@ -0,0 +1,87 @@ +# `make obj`: out-of-tree builds with BSD `make(1)` + +_Published: September 28, 2021_ + +If you've ever built parts of OpenBSD from source, you may know +that the sequence of commands recommended by +[`release(8)`](https://man.openbsd.org/release.8) is: + + $ make obj + $ make + # make install + +If, like me, you've forgotten the `make obj` step, you'll find +yourself with many derived files in the current directory of +whatever program you're building. By running `make obj` first, a +directory called _obj_ appears and the derived files (usually \*.o +files) are placed there instead. Cleverly, the _obj_ directory is +actually a symlink to another filesystem under _/usr/obj_, +making it truly an out-of-tree build. + +Up until recently, I understood what the `obj` target did and why +it was useful. However, it wasn't until I tried to replicate it +with the build for text.alexkarle.com that I discovered how it +worked. I figured I'd document it here in case it helps anyone +else. + +## How it Works + +My discovery of the inner workings of this target was a classic +lesson in RTFM. After 10-15 minutes of trying to parse the +makefiles in _/usr/share/mk_, I finally searched for _obj_ in the +[`make(1)` man page](https://man.openbsd.org/make.1), and sure +enough the answer was the first hit! I've copied it for +convenience below (licensed under the BSD-3 clause): + +> *`.OBJDIR:`* +> Path to the directory where targets are built. At +> startup, make searches for an alternate directory to +> place target files. make tries to `chdir(2)` into +> `MAKEOBJDIR` (or obj if `MAKEOBJDIR` is not defined), and +> sets `.OBJDIR` accordingly. Should that fail, `.OBJDIR` +> is set to `.CURDIR`. + +With this new knowledge, getting an out-of-tree build was almost as +simple as running `mkdir obj` before `make`! + +The one catch was that, having chdir'd in, I had to canonicalize +the paths to any scripts used in the build recipes. For instance, +I have a genpost.sh script in the bin/ directory of this repo. To +call it from the obj directory, I needed to use its absolute path +via the .CURDIR variable: + + $(.CURDIR)/bin/genpost.sh < $< > $@ + +## Portability + +While I mostly build my site on OpenBSD, it's important to me that +it builds with GNU make too. + +Unfortunately, the `.OBJDIR` chdir'ing appears to be an extension in +OpenBSD's make (and possibly NetBSD too). The good news is that, +with one more trick, GNU make support is easy to add (albeit +without out-of-tree builds). + +The one final hack to support GNU make was to define a portable +version of `.CURDIR`. Since `.CURDIR` isn't defined in GNU make (which +uses `CURDIR` instead), I had to define the `DIR` variable that's the +concatenation of the two: + + DIR = $(.CURDIR)$(CURDIR) + +## Conclusion + +I hope this sheds some light on why `make obj` is common practice +on OpenBSD as well as how to add similar support to your own +projects! + +While not as flexible as GNU make's pattern matching inference +rules (that allow builds in subdirectories), I find the chdir-ing +into obj a cleverly simple way to obtain a similar end result. + +## See Also + +- [text.alexkarle.com's origin story](/blog/text-only.html) +- [writing the blog in mdoc(7)](/blog/my-old-man.html) + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/mdoc-to-nihdoc.txt b/www/blog/mdoc-to-nihdoc.txt @@ -0,0 +1,164 @@ +# Writing a Custom Markup Parser for this Site + +_Published: December 28, 2021_ + +## How it All Happened + +Almost exactly a year ago, I moved this site from templated +markdown to a [static site built with `mdoc(7)`](/blog/my-old-man.html). +I ported 5 blog posts in the process and ended up writing 7 more +over the course of the year. + +While it was a success in teaching me +[`mdoc(7)`](https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7), I found that it +slowed me down a bit in authoring blog posts. + +Around the same time as I was feeling this slowness, I began +actively phlogging on my [gopherhole](gopher://alexkarle.com) and +[even started posting gopher-only content](/blog/burrowing.html). +I really enjoyed writing plaintext posts because they are quick +to write and, more importantly, highly durable to changes in +technology. I can't imagine a world where one cannot open a plain +`.txt` file and read/edit it. + +I got a real sense for the importance of optimizing for archival +while browsing gopher--it's incredible to be reading textfiles +older than me. It made me realize that I want to be sure that my +content can survive for decades with minimal effort. + +So, I started thinking about how I could move my site's source +(pre-HTML) to a more readable plaintext format. Markdown was the +obvious choice, but I wanted to stay true to my +[creative limitation](/blog/creative-coding.html) of keeping this +site buildable by base OpenBSD, so I had to find another option. + +It was about 10 days into solving Advent of Code puzzles that I +realized I could redirect some of the puzzling effort at the +problem and write my own markup parser. The result, a few weeks +later, is [`nihdoc(1)`](https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/nihdoc). +`nihdoc(1)` (a play on the fact that markdown is *N*ot *I*nvented +*H*ere) provides support for all the basic syntax I'd want in a +blog post--nested lists, _inline_ *styles* and `code`, code +blocks and block quotes, and headers. It was a blast to write, +and I learned a lot in the process! + +I suspect the CSS for the blog will still change (maybe a dark +mode? or something a little less plain), but I tried to keep the +resulting HTML pretty bare in support of accessibility and +portability--it should read well in screenreaders, embedded in +RSS feeds, and more. + +If you want to see the source for any post, just replace the +`.html` extension in the URL with `.txt`! For example, here's +[this post's source](/blog/mdoc-to-nihdoc.txt). + +## Implementation Highlights + +If you read this far, I figure you might be interested in some of +the implementation details and design decisions. + +### Stream Based Parsing + +Probably the most interesting detail of the parser is that it is +stream-based with constant memory usage. In other words, it will +start spitting out the input and the HTML markup as soon as it +can decisively figure out what state it's in (i.e. has the +paragraph ended, etc). Keeping track of this state is done with a +handful of booleans/integers and doesn't involve storing lines in +memory. In fact, the current implementation reads the input one +character at a time! + +This is an efficiency win for large documents (not that my posts +are that long), but was also just a fun constraint to try to code +within. In practice, I found I was able to get support for almost +everything I wanted (nested lists, etc) with maybe the exception of +"bottom of the document" links that markdown allows. More on that +later. + +### Balancing Ease of Implementation with Syntax + +One of the most interesting challenges in designing a markup +language is settling on a syntax that's both easy-ish to +implement (I'm a big believer in simpler = less bugs) but also +syntactically appealing in plaintext format (after all, one of +the main motivations was to make the source archive-ready). + +The best example of this was deciding how to write links. + +I started off with the easiest implementation, which is also the +least appealing (IMHO). A link looked like this: + + [https://alexkarle.com/blog my blog] + +This is super easy to parse one character at a time. In +psuedo-code: + +1. If current character is *`[`*, print *`<a href="`* +2. Print all characters (the href) until you see a space/newline +3. Once we see the space/newline, print *`">`* +4. Print all characters (the description) up until the `]` +5. Once we see the *`]`*, print the closing *`</a>`* + +This fits really nicely into our "parse one character at a time", +since each special character in the link corresponds to a direct +piece of HTML to output. However, it's ugly to print links that +have no description, such as: + + [https://alexkarle.com https://alexkarle.com] + +To address this, the next evolution added a (stack-allocated) +"link buffer" that would store the href as it was printed so that +if the ']' was hit before a space/newline, it was assumed that +the description was the href and it would print the link buffer +in the place of the description, enabling "bare links" like so: + + [https://alexkarle.com] + +I was about to go live on my blog with that iteration because I +liked it _enough_, but the one thing that really bothered me was +that it's hard to read the description after the link. To the +plaintext reader, the description is way more important than the +link! Especially for long links, it's distracting to have to scan +ahead to continue a sentence. + +I really wanted markdown-style links like so: + + [my blog](https://alexkarle.com/blog) + +The immediate problem was that the parser can no longer print the +characters as it sees them, since the URL happens after the +description in the input but needs to come before the description +in the output. I realized however that this is a similar problem +to the way I used the linkbuf for bare links--all I had to do was +store the description in the buffer, and play it back after +printing the href. It's the same amount of memory, but a tad more +complex, since the description is allowed to have inline styles, +so before pushing onto the link buf, we need to check for styles +and push those too (effectively a smaller version of the main +loop). + +The final form of markdown links that I'd like to support but +can't is a "postfix link", link so: + + This is a [link] in + a paragraph + ... + [link]: https://alexkarle.com + +Since the actual link could be anywhere in the document, this +kind of parsing requires buffering potentially the whole +document, which violates the streaming condition (which I'd like +to keep!), so I stopped short of it. + +## Conclusion + +I hope you found this discussion of syntax, tradeoffs, and +parsers interesting! I'm sure there's a lot more I can learn and +improve on, but it's been a fun evolution from the `mdoc(7)` I +started with! Check out the +[source](https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/nihdoc) if you're curious. I +expect it'll change rather frequently in the next few weeks, so I +wouldn't advise depending on it yourself (but I wanted to open +source it to share with others as a teaching tool regardless!). + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/my-old-man-orig.html b/www/blog/my-old-man-orig.html @@ -0,0 +1,268 @@ +<!DOCTYPE html> +<html lang="en"> +<head> + <meta charset="utf-8"/> + <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0"/> +<style> +/* general defaults */ +body { + background-color: #F5F5F5; + margin-left: 20px; + margin-right: 20px; + font-size: 1.3em; + line-height: 1.3; + font-family: monospace; +} + +/* style tweaks */ +a:link { color: #0a7899; } +a:visited { color: #033a4a; } +code { font-size: 1em; } +h1 { font-size: 1.1em; } +h2 { font-size: 1em; } +.foot-license { + margin-top: 16px; + font-size: .7em; + position: static; + bottom: 0; +} + +/* override bold/italic colors within permalinks */ +a.permalink { text-decoration: none } +b,i { color: #000000 } + +/* Responsive screen sizes */ +@media only screen and (min-width: 992px) { + body { + width: 60%; + margin: 0 auto; + } +} +@media only screen and (min-width: 600px) and (max-width: 991px) { + body { + width: 80%; + margin: 0 auto; + } +} + +/* Smaller font on small screens */ +@media only screen and (max-width: 599px) { + body { font-size: 1.1em; } +} + +/* margins around head/foot */ +table.foot { margin-top: 3em; } +table.head { margin-bottom: 3em; } + +/* scrollbars on the block-display content */ +div.Bd-indent { + border-left-color: gray; + border-left-style: solid; + border-left-width: 2px; + border-radius: 5px; + padding-left: 1em; +} + +.Bd > pre { + overflow-x: auto; +} + +/* Bl-tag correctly with grid for blog.7 */ +dl.Bl-tag { + display: grid; + grid-template-columns: max-content auto +} +dl.Bl-tag dd { + margin-left: 16px; + margin-bottom: 1em; +} + +/* defaults from mandoc(1)'s inlined CSS */ +table.head, table.foot { width: 100%; } +td.head-rtitle, td.foot-os { text-align: right; } +.Nd, .Bf, .Op { display: inline; } +.Pa, .Ad { font-style: italic; } +.Ms { font-weight: bold; } +.Bl-diag > dt { font-weight: bold; } +code.Nm, .Fl, .Cm, .Ic, code.In, .Fd, .Fn, .Cd { + font-weight: bold; +} +</style> + <title>MY-OLD-MAN(7)</title> +<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"></head> +<body> +<table class="head"> + <tr> + <td class="head-ltitle">MY-OLD-MAN(7)</td> + <td class="head-rtitle">MY-OLD-MAN(7)</td> + </tr> +</table> +<div class="manual-text"> +<section class="Sh"> +<h1 class="Sh" id="NAME"><a class="permalink" href="#NAME">NAME</a></h1> +<p class="Pp"><code class="Nm">my-old-man</code> &#x2014; + <span class="Nd">adventures in using + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7">mdoc(7)</a> as the + markup for this site</span></p> +</section> +<section class="Sh"> +<h1 class="Sh" id="SYNOPSIS"><a class="permalink" href="#SYNOPSIS">SYNOPSIS</a></h1> +<div class="Bd Bd-indent Li"> +<pre>Uh oh, +looks like, +I'm seeing more of my old man(1) in me + ~ Mac DeMarco (added (1) by me)</pre> +</div> +</section> +<section class="Sh"> +<h1 class="Sh" id="DESCRIPTION"><a class="permalink" href="#DESCRIPTION">DESCRIPTION</a></h1> +<p class="Pp">While Mac wasn't talking about good old roff-style man pages, I + felt his words were a fun description of my effort to move from a markdown + based templated site to a + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7">mdoc(7)</a> based + site.</p> +<p class="Pp" id="why">After pointing out that + <a class="Lk" href="https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com/file/intro.7.html">I + really did</a> rewrite my site in + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7">mdoc(7)</a>, you might + be wondering <a class="permalink" href="#why"><i class="Em">why</i></a> I + would do this. This blog post is intended to answer just that.</p> +</section> +<section class="Sh"> +<h1 class="Sh" id="WHY"><a class="permalink" href="#WHY">WHY</a></h1> +<section class="Ss"> +<h2 class="Ss" id="For_the_learning_experience"><a class="permalink" href="#For_the_learning_experience">For + the learning experience</a></h2> +<p class="Pp">The single biggest motivator of the rewrite was that I like to use + this site as a playground for learning new (old) technology, and + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7">mdoc(7)</a> was on my + list of tech to learn.</p> +<p class="Pp">What better way to learn a new markup language than to port an + existing project to use it?</p> +<p class="Pp">I had a blast transferring my old posts and coming up with a new + build system.</p> +</section> +<section class="Ss"> +<h2 class="Ss" id="For_the_look"><a class="permalink" href="#For_the_look">For + the look</a></h2> +<p class="Pp">I really enjoy a good + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/man.1">man(1)</a> page.</p> +<p class="Pp">You've probably heard it before, but I'll say it again: one of the + best parts of using OpenBSD is its concise and comprehensive man pages in + the base system.</p> +<p class="Pp">There's a certain warm fuzzy feeling when you can learn something + both without internet access and with the knowledge that it is the + authoritative source.</p> +<p class="Pp">I want my site to be a homage to good, well thought out, + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/man.1">man(1)</a> pages.</p> +</section> +<section class="Ss"> +<h2 class="Ss" id="Keeping_it_all_in_base"><a class="permalink" href="#Keeping_it_all_in_base">Keeping + it all in base</a></h2> +<p class="Pp">As an OpenBSD nerd, I find a bit of joy in having a site which is + built, deployed, and served all via the base OpenBSD system.</p> +<p class="Pp">By using + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/mandoc.1">mandoc(1)</a> instead + of Markdown.pl, I can now build my site without any additional + dependencies.</p> +<p class="Pp" id="fast">Better yet, + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/mandoc.1">mandoc(1)</a> is + ported to the various Linux distros I use day to day, and it is + <a class="permalink" href="#fast"><i class="Em">fast</i></a>.</p> +</section> +</section> +<section class="Sh"> +<h1 class="Sh" id="HOW"><a class="permalink" href="#HOW">HOW</a></h1> +<p class="Pp">If you read this far, I thought you might be interested to hear + how I'm deploying the content.</p> +<p class="Pp">I'm a big fan of automation, so I've rigged up the site to deploy + on a push to the master branch. Doing so involved two steps.</p> +<section class="Ss"> +<h2 class="Ss" id="Building_the_mdoc"><a class="permalink" href="#Building_the_mdoc">Building + the mdoc</a></h2> +<p class="Pp">I created a small Makefile that builds each HTML file from each + man page source.</p> +<p class="Pp">The relevant bit is the implicit suffix rule to convert each .7 + file to .html:</p> +<div class="Bd Pp Bd-indent Li"> +<pre>.SUFFIXES: .7 .html +.7.html: + @echo &quot;mandoc $&lt;&quot; + @mandoc -Thtml -O 'man=%N.html;https://man.openbsd.org/%N.%S,style=style.css' $&lt; \ + | sed 's#&lt;/head&gt;#&lt;meta name=&quot;viewport&quot; content=&quot;width=device-width,initial-scale=1&quot;&gt;&amp;# ' \ + &gt; $@</pre> +</div> +<p class="Pp" id="$_">This looks crazy, but it's not too complex. First, know + that <a class="permalink" href="#$_"><b class="Sy">$&lt;</b></a> is the + source (the &lt;name&gt;.7 page), and + <a class="permalink" href="#$@"><b class="Sy" id="$@">$@</b></a> is the + target (the &lt;name&gt;.html page). The + <a class="permalink" href="#@"><b class="Sy" id="@">@</b></a> prefix is a + bit of magic to suppress printing the command run (so that all the output + shown on git-push is just a single &quot;mandoc&quot; line for each file + updated).</p> +<p class="Pp" id=".Xr">Moving on to the mandoc command, I use the html output of + mandoc via -T, with the -O switch specifying that linked man-page references + should look locally first, then to point to man.openbsd.org. This allows me + to quickly reference OpenBSD base tools and pages, while also using the + terse <a class="permalink" href="#.Xr"><b class="Sy">.Xr</b></a> macro for + linking individual site pages.</p> +<p class="Pp">Finally, I use a + <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/sed.1">sed(1)</a> oneliner to + splice in a &lt;meta&gt; viewport tag for mobile devices.</p> +<p class="Pp">And that's really it! The rest is just listing the man pages I + want built, with a phony default target depending on the html pages so that + a &#x2018;<code class="Li">make</code>&#x2019; builds them all. Check out + the full source + <a class="Lk" href="https://git.alexkarle.com/alexkarle.com/file/Makefile.html">here</a>.</p> +</section> +<section class="Ss"> +<h2 class="Ss" id="Deploying_via_git_hook"><a class="permalink" href="#Deploying_via_git_hook">Deploying + via git hook</a></h2> +<p class="Pp">Since I'm self-hosting git on the same server as the website, it's + trivial to deploy when it receives a push by leveraging git hooks.</p> +<p class="Pp">For the unfamiliar, git hooks are simply shell scripts that are + triggered by specific git actions. In this case, I used the post-receive + hook to publish after the refs were updated via a + &#x2018;<code class="Li">git push</code>&#x2019;.</p> +<p class="Pp">More specifically, I added the following to + <span class="Pa">&lt;git-dir&gt;/hooks/post-receive</span>:</p> +<div class="Bd Pp Bd-indent Li"> +<pre>echo &quot;Deploying to to /var/www/htdocs... &quot; +WT=/var/www/htdocs +git -C ${dir} --work-tree=${WT} checkout -f master +make -C ${WT} +echo &quot;done&quot;</pre> +</div> +<p class="Pp">So, on any push, it checks out the entire source tree into the + webserver's content area and rebuilds only the necessary HTML files (thanks + to <a class="Xr" href="https://man.openbsd.org/make.1">make(1)</a>).</p> +<p class="Pp">If I had files I didn't want served, I would modify it to build + elsewhere and copy the contents to /var/www; however, I'm publishing both + the source for the site and the git history at + <a class="Lk" href="https://git.alexkarle.com">https://git.alexkarle.com</a>, + so I don't see any harm to having the README.md accessible from the + root.</p> +</section> +</section> +<section class="Sh"> +<h1 class="Sh" id="SEE_ALSO"><a class="permalink" href="#SEE_ALSO">SEE + ALSO</a></h1> +<ul class="Bl-bullet Bl-compact"> + <li><a class="Xr" href="blog.html">blog(7)</a></li> + <li><a class="Lk" href="https://www.git-scm.com/docs/githooks">git + hooks</a></li> +</ul> +</section> +</div> +<table class="foot"> + <tr> + <td class="foot-date">December 30, 2020</td> + <td class="foot-os">OpenBSD 7.0</td> + </tr> +</table> +<p class="foot-license"> + © 2019-2021 Alex Karle | <a href="/">Home</a> | <a href="/license.html">License</a> +</p> +</body> +</html> diff --git a/www/blog/my-old-man.txt b/www/blog/my-old-man.txt @@ -0,0 +1,143 @@ +# my-old-man: Adventures in using mdoc(7) as the markup for this site + +_Published: December 30, 2020_ + +*Update:* As of December 2021, I've moved to a +[new markup format](/blog/mdoc-to-nihdoc.html). +For a glimpse at what the format discussed looks like, here's +[the original post](/blog/my-old-man-orig.html). + + Uh oh, + looks like, + I'm seeing more of my old man(1) in me + ~ Mac DeMarco (added (1) by me) + +## Description + +While Mac wasn't talking about good old roff-style man pages, I +felt his words were a fun description of my effort to move from a +markdown based templated site to a +[`mdoc(7)`](https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7) based site. + +After pointing out that +[I really did](https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/alexkarle.com/commit/844441fce7ac5c0364b3fe1a217da6889cb937ba) +rewrite my site in `mdoc(7)`, you might be wondering why I would do this. +This blog post is intended to answer just that. + +## Why + +### For the learning experience + +The single biggest motivator of the rewrite was that I like to use +this site as a playground for learning new (old) technology, and +`mdoc(7)` was on my list of tech to learn. + +What better way to learn a new markup language than to port an +existing project to use it? + +I had a blast transferring my old posts and coming up with a new +build system. + +### For the look + +I really enjoy a good [`man(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/man.1) page. + +You've probably heard it before, but I'll say it again: one of the +best parts of using OpenBSD is its concise and comprehensive man +pages in the base system. + +There's a certain warm fuzzy feeling when you can learn something +both without internet access and with the knowledge that it is the +authoritative source. + +I want my site to be a homage to good, well thought out, `man(1)` +pages. + +### Keeping it all in base + +As an OpenBSD nerd, I find a bit of joy in having a site which is +built, deployed, and served all via the base OpenBSD system. + +By using [`mandoc(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/mandoc.1) instead of +Markdown.pl, I can now build my site without any additional +dependencies. + +Better yet, `mandoc(1)` is ported to the various Linux distros I use +day to day, and it is fast. + +## How + +If you read this far, I thought you might be interested to hear how +I'm deploying the content. + +I'm a big fan of automation, so I've rigged up the site to deploy +on a push to the master branch. Doing so involved two steps. + +### Building the mdoc + +I created a small Makefile that builds each HTML file from each man +page source. + +The relevant bit is the implicit suffix rule to convert each `.7` +file to `.html`: + + SUFFIXES: .7 .html + 7.html: + @echo "mandoc $<" + @mandoc -Thtml -O 'man=%N.html;https://man.openbsd.org/%N.%S,style=style.css' $< \ + | sed 's#</head>#<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1">&# ' \ + > $@ + +This looks crazy, but it's not too complex. First, know that `$<` is +the source (the `<name>.7` page), and `$@` is the target (the +`<name>.html` page). The `@` prefix is a bit of magic to suppress +printing the command run (so that all the output shown on git-push +is just a single "mandoc" line for each file updated). + +Moving on to the mandoc command, I use the html output of mandoc +via `-T,` with the `-O` switch specifying that linked man-page +references should look locally first, then to point to +man.openbsd.org. This allows me to quickly reference OpenBSD base +tools and pages, while also using the terse `.Xr` macro for linking +individual site pages. + +Finally, I use a `sed(1)` oneliner to splice in a <meta> viewport tag +for mobile devices. + +And that's really it! The rest is just listing the man pages I +want built, with a phony default target depending on the html pages +so that a `make` builds them all. + +### Deploying via git hook + +Since I'm self-hosting git on the same server as the website, it's +trivial to deploy when it receives a push by leveraging git hooks. + +For the unfamiliar, git hooks are simply shell scripts that are +triggered by specific git actions. In this case, I used the +post-receive hook to publish after the refs were updated via a `git +push`. + +More specifically, I added the following to `<git-dir>/hooks/post-receive:` + + echo "Deploying to to /var/www/htdocs... " + WT=/var/www/htdocs + git -C ${dir} --work-tree=${WT} checkout -f master + make -C ${WT} + echo "done" + +So, on any push, it checks out the entire source tree into the +webserver's content area and rebuilds only the necessary HTML files +(thanks to `make(1)`). + +If I had files I didn't want served, I would modify it to build +elsewhere and copy the contents to `/var/www`; however, I'm +publishing both the source for the site and the git history at +[https://git.alexkarle.com], so I don't see any harm to having the +README.md accessible from the root. + +## See Also + +- [githooks documentation](https://www.git-scm.com/docs/githooks) + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/on-writing.txt b/www/blog/on-writing.txt @@ -0,0 +1,48 @@ +# Thoughts on writing without an audience + +_Published: October 22, 2020_ + +I wrote a blog post 3 weeks ago but never published it. I spent a +couple hours writing, proof-reading, and rewriting, and settled to +re-read once more in the morning and publish if I still liked it +after a good nights sleep. + +I got caught up with other things, and a day or two later re-read +it and still didn't end up publishing it. I didn't think it was +quite right. I liked it well enough, but I was worried other +people would judge it. + +But here's the irony -- as far as I know, I have no readers. +Publishing it is almost equivalent to shouting into the void. + +So why did I care so much? + +As I found myself thinking about how I'd revise the original post +tonight, I realized that maybe this fear of judgment from non- +existent (but potential future) internet strangers was a much more +interesting topic to explore than my original musings. So here I +am hashing it out. + +I think the fear of judgment comes from a mixture of seeing public +figures have their pasts (preserved in the digital era) come back +to haunt them combined with observing how readers can react +strongly and negatively to posts. I don't plan to ever become so +famous as to have a blog haunt me, nor do I ever expect enough +readers to have overwhelmingly unpleasant reactions, but the fear +still got to me. + +But I want to persevere, and that's ultimately what writing this is +about. I'm not writing for fame or attention. I'm not writing to +further my career or put it on my resume. I'm writing for me. For +the clarity I get from expressing my thoughts, and for the joy I +get looking back at where I was months or years ago. + +Why host them publicly? Well, I really enjoy a good tech blog, and +admire a blogger or two out there. I want to be the change I want +to see in the internet and migrate from centralized social networks +back to a decentralized network of personal and self-hosted sites. + +And who knows, maybe one day someone will read this and have felt +the same. I guess I'm writing for that person too. + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/self-hosted.txt b/www/blog/self-hosted.txt @@ -0,0 +1,54 @@ +# self-hosted: A tale of migrating to my own server + +_Published: July 19, 2020_ + +If you look at [the first post](/blog/a-new-hope.html) on this site, you'll +see that this site started as a series of static HTML files that I +was, by hand, uploading to Fastmail via their "files" GUI. + +Being a total nerd for automation, I was always on the lookout for +an excuse to migrate to my own server, where I could (over)engineer +a pipeline to build my static content and deploy it without ever +leaving the terminal. + +That excuse presented itself in the form of needing to get a VPS to +stand up my hobby-project, [`euchre.live`](https://euchre.live). +If I was going to pay for a tiny VM, it was a no-brainer to move +my personal site to it too. + +This turned out to be a great learning experience -- getting hands +on experience with reverse proxies, DNS, and a variety of operating +systems and webservers (first hosted on Alpine Linux and migrated +to OpenBSD). Additionally, I could self-host git repos, which has +long been a nerd-goal of mine :) + +I plan to write a lengthier post about the joys of self-hosting in +the future, but for now, I really just wanted to give a brief +update on where I landed and what the current stack is. + +I'm currently running (in no particular order): + +- *OS:* OpenBSD +- *Web server:* OpenBSD's `httpd(8)` + - Serves the `www.` static content + - Also serves [https://git.alexkarle.com] +- *Reverse proxy:* OpenBSD's `relayd(8)` + - Used to send traffic between [https://euchre.live] (which uses + a Mojolicious web server as the backend) and + [https://alexkarle.com] based on URL +- *`www` content:* + - 100% static content + - No metrics, ads, or tracking + - Posts and pages written in markdown + - HTML generated with a pipeline of the original `Markdown.pl` + into a small templating Perl script that I home-rolled +- *Git:* + - Public repos served with `git-daemon(1)` over the `git://` + protocol + - Push access via the `ssh://` protocol + - static HTML of content generated via post-receive hook with + [`stagit(1)`](https://git.codemadness.org/stagit/) + +That's all for now! + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/text-only.txt b/www/blog/text-only.txt @@ -0,0 +1,70 @@ +# text-only: Announcing text.alexkarle.com + +_Published: September 20, 2021_ + +This past week I rolled out [https://text.alexkarle.com], and I +wanted to write a little bit about it! + +## What + +text.alexkarle.com is a text-only ascii dump of this entire site. +It's served over HTTP, HTTPS, and Gopher to provide a wide array of +options for accessing the content. + +## Why + +I'm a huge fan of the "small internet" and lightweight sites in +general. Although I'm not an active participant in any of the +tilde communities, I really appreciate the commitment to plaintext, +\*NIX, and simple software. + +At some point in my browsing of the tildeverse, I stumbled across +Gopher and took a liking to the simple protocol. Surfing +gopherspace is so awesomely fast and simple compared to the slow, +ad-filled, modern web. Better yet, it's totally removed from the +commercialization of the internet. No one is serving content on +Gopher to make money. It's full of art and real, empathetic, +humans. + +For my own part, I started serving an ascii dump of the `mdoc(7)` +content on this site over Gopher (via +[`gophernicus(8)`](https://gophernicus.org)) almost 7 months ago. +However, I was never really happy with how it was organized or +generated (hence the lack of an announcement on the `blog(7)`). + +It was the discovery of a fellow `mdoc(7)` website over at +[https://text.causal.agency] that inspired me to revisit my approach +to publishing a text-only version of this site. I finally replaced +the scripted afterthought of a gopher publisher with a first class +build target and decided to expand the offering from gopher-only to +HTTP(S). I figured someone might prefer to browse it that way +(maybe retro computing enthusiasts?), and with `httpd(8)` already +running, it came basically for free! + +## How + +I started to write about all the "challenges" I faced in this +process, but really these were all self-imposed problems from +restricting myself to a POSIX subset of BSD `make(1)` (in the name of +[creative coding](creative-coding.html)). I think had I chosen either BSD make with +extensions or GNU make, the build would have been much cleaner, but +with a couple of hacks it's okay as is. + +Maybe I'll write about it someday, but it didn't feel worth holding +up this "announcement". The TL;DR: I added another inference rule +for `*.7` -> `*.txt` and moved from a "build in tree" model (where the +source tree was what was served by `httpd(8)`) to a "run the install +target after build" model. The latter is necessary because POSIX +inference rules only build into the current directory and I don't +want text.alexkarle.com users to see the `*.html` there too. + +Of course, if you're curious to see how the bits come together, I +publish all of the site source at +[https://sr.ht/~akarle/alexkarle.com]! + +## Update + +As of November 15, 2021, text.alexkarle.com was moved entirely to +gopher. See [this blog post](/blog/burrowing.html) for more info. + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/use-feeds.txt b/www/blog/use-feeds.txt @@ -0,0 +1,100 @@ +# RSS/Atom feeds; what are they and why you should care + +_Published: February 9, 2021_ + +I've always wanted this site to be an homage to tech that I enjoy +using, and recently, that's included old-school RSS/Atom feeds. +However, up until now, I had only been a feed consumer and had +never produced my own. So, this past weekend I decided to hunker +down and read enough of the spec to generate one for this site. + +But let's back up -- what is a feed? Why should you care? + +A feed is simply a standardized listing of items a source (blog, +vlog, newspaper, etc) has generated recently. Users then consume +multiple feeds to get centralized notifications on new content. +Think "following" on social media, but generalized for any content +accessible on the web. + +The most important feature of a feed is that it has been +standardized and is not controlled by any individual corporation. +This ensures that users are not only free from vendor lock-in, but +it also allows for an increasingly diverse set of clients and +sources. + +For example, there are clients ranging from FOSS text only terminal +clients like [`newsboat(1)`](https://newsboat.org) to commercial apps +like [Feedly](https://feedly.com). And despite being drastically +different UI's, their purpose is the same: allow you to subscribe +to any number of feeds, and centralize your notifications. + +The idea is simple, but it's transformed the way I interact with +the web. It saves me time in not browsing the infinite scroll that +has become social media, and it allows me to stay up to date with +smaller blogs that don't post frequently (cough, like yours truly, +cough). + +Consider a new blog post on this site. Without a feed, you'd have +to periodically check my `blog(7)` for updates or hear about it +through some other link aggregation or social media site +(Hackernews, Reddit, etc). Adding a feed allows those who want to +follow to get notifications, without checking other locations or +having to waste time checking back periodically. + +So if you haven't tried a feed reader ever, go find one that suits +your fancy and give it a try! In an era where user upvoted content +reigns king (Reddit, Facebook, etc), it's really empowering as a +user to decide what you see updates for and to be able to check +them on your own time. And if you're a publisher of any content, +consider creating a feed for others to follow. I'll certainly +appreciate it! + +It's never too late to take control of your digital habits, and +using a feed reader is a good place to start. + +## Implementation + +If you read this far, I thought you might also be interested in +hearing not only the what and the why but also the how. + +Due to the recent migration to using `mdoc(7)` as the markup for this +site (detailed in [my-old-man(7)](/blog/my-old-man.html)), I knew that +finding an off-the-shelf feed generator would be unlikely. +Plus, with my general desire to keep the site build-able by base +OpenBSD, I figured it was as good an excuse as any to read the +spec and generate it myself. + +I ended up choosing Atom over RSS mostly based on some online +opinions that it is a stricter standard, but I can't say much to +back that up. What I can say is that after the initial confusion +of how to escape the embedded HTML in the XML feed, it was pretty +smooth sailing. + +The full implementation is in +[genatom.sh](https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/alexkarle.com/tree/5c1fd5edca840e3ec2f8a80b8fed763d30cfa11a/item/bin/genatom.sh) +and basically boils down to: + +1. `grep(1)` call through the blog.7 file to get a list of entries + and their dates +2. Print the header of the XML (with newest date from 1.) +3. For each item in entries, add the XML entry along with the + content as generated by `mandoc(1)` with the `-O` fragment option. + This ensures the "notification" has the full post -- users + never even need to visit the site! +4. End by printing the footer of the XML + +And that's it! The only real trick was to use +[CDATA sections](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CDATA) around the entry +content in the XML to escape the HTML tags. + +And of course, like everything else in this blog, it rebuilds on +`git-push` via a call to `make(1)`. + +## See Also + +- [My Atom feed](https://alexkarle.com/atom.xml) +- [Wiki page on Atom](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom_(Web_standard%29) +- [Atom RFC](https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4287) +- [Related advocacy](https://atthis.link/blog/2021/rss.html) + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/blog/use-git.txt b/www/blog/use-git.txt @@ -0,0 +1,102 @@ +# Non-standard uses for `git(1)` + +_Published: November 7, 2021_ + +In this post, I'm not going to teach you how to use +[`git(1)`](https://git-scm.org). Instead, I wanted to write a +quick post to encourage you to use git for non-conventional use +cases (i.e. things other than source code). + +If perchance you're not familiar with git, there's a ton of good +documentation out there. I'd recommend starting with the official +and free [Pro Git](https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2). Also, as a PSA, +just know that git stores whole snapshots and NOT diffs. + +## Background + +Git is a distributed version control system, and this is a +beautiful thing. I feel it's often lost on us, given that we use +it most frequently on centralized forges for team collaboration +(GitHub, GitLab, etc). + +Git being distributed means you can: + +1. Use it offline (your copy is "first class") +2. Mirror it to as many places as you want + +In other words, git can be used without any dependence on a third- +party service or company and with complete ownership of private +data. Forges (and I recommend [https://sourcehut.org]) are a great +place to backup your code and collaborate, but you don't have to +use a forge to use git as a futureproof way to do what it does +best: version your files. + +## Story Time + +When I started my first job in tech, I found that it was a good +habit to take personal notes. It was incredibly useful to quickly +reference obscure CLI commands or system knowledge gained from +pairing. These were things that were too small or personal to make +it into standard documentation but invaluable to have on hand. + +My first solution was shoving them all into a directory called +~/notes as plaintext files. They were easy to write and reference, +and it was simple to back them up by copying the directory to +another drive nightly. + +Over time, the `cp -a` trick broke down: + +- Files deleted in the source prevailed in the backup +- Changes more than a day old were lost! + +Around the same time, I started getting more familiar with git, and +it finally occurred to me: I could use git and still keep these +notes private! + +Git can clone/push/pull across filesystems, so in the matter of +minutes I solved both of my issues with just: + + # Set up the backup mirror + $ git init --bare /backup/drive/notes.git + + # Put it to use! + $ cd ~/notes + $ git init && git add . && git commit -m "import" + $ git remote add origin /backup/drive/notes.git + $ git push -u origin main + +If you don't have a backup drive mounted, it's equally good (or +better) to make the remote a repo accessed over SSH: + + # On the remote host + user@example.com~$ git init --bare ~/notes.git + + # On the local host + $ git remote add origin user@example.com:notes.git + +## Going Further + +These days, I shudder at the thought of any important plaintext on +my system that's not version-controlled somewhere. Too many hours +are spent writing these little files, and it's so easy to version +them, why risk losing any of that history? + +Aside from my private notes, I version: + +- System config files from /etc +- Personal config files (dotfiles) +- My passwords (via [`pass(1)`](https://passwordstore.org)) +- A small set of personal patches for FOSS projects I have yet to + polish and upstream (a-la ports-system) +- My resume (admittedly still a DOCX from college, but versioning + has really helped) + +In conclusion, my advice to anyone writing anything of importance: +just use `git(1)`! + +## See Also + +- [Commits are snapshots, not diffs](https://github.blog/2020-12-17-commits-are-snapshots-not-diffs/), + by Derrick Stolee + +[Back to blog](/blog) diff --git a/www/footer.html b/www/footer.html @@ -0,0 +1,5 @@ +<footer> + © 2019-2021 Alex Karle | <a href="/">Home</a> | <a href="/license.html">License</a> +</footer> +</body> +</html> diff --git a/www/header.html b/www/header.html @@ -0,0 +1,32 @@ +<!DOCTYPE html> +<html lang="en"> +<head> +<meta charset="utf-8"/> +<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"> +<!-- Inspired by https://www.swyx.io/css-100-bytes/ --> +<style> +html { + max-width: 70ch; + padding: 3em 1em; + margin: auto; + font-size: 1em; + font-family: sans-serif; +} +footer { + margin-top: 50px; + font-size: .8em; +} +code { font-family: consolas, courier, monospace; } +h1 { font-size: 1.5em; } +h2 { font-size: 1.2em; } +h3 { font-size: 1.1em; } +blockquote, pre { + background: #f2f2f2; + overflow: auto; + padding: 10px; + border: 2px solid black; +} +</style> +<title>alexkarle.com</title> +</head> +<body> diff --git a/www/index.txt b/www/index.txt @@ -0,0 +1,49 @@ +# Welcome + +## About Me + +Hi! I'm Alex. I'm a software engineer living near Boston, MA. +My current technical interests include operating systems, +developer tooling, and small internet protocols like +[Gopher](/blog/burrowing.html), but I'm constantly learning new +things that I get excited about. Occasionally, I might write +about it here on my [blog](/blog). + +Outside of tech, I enjoy playing music, hiking, and a good board +game shared among friends. + +## About This Site + +This site is an ever-changing hobby project where I use the +markup and build system as an excuse to learn and/or build new +tools. + +In 2020, I [rewrote the site](/blog/my-old-man.html) as a series +of man-pages in [`mdoc(7)`](https://man.openbsd.org/mdoc.7), +writing new blog posts in the language and developing a toolchain +to [support feeds](/blog/use-feeds.html), [text-only versions](/blog/text-only.html), +and eventually a [gopher mirror](/blog/burrowing.html). + +At the end of 2021, I really wanted a lower-friction medium to +blog on (akin to the plaintext I was writing on my +[phlog](gopher://alexkarle.com/1/phlog)). Looking to keep the +site buildable by base OpenBSD as a +[creative limitation](/blog/creative-coding.html), +I took the opportunity to write my own +lightweight markup parser, [`nihdoc`](https://git.sr.ht/~akarle/nihdoc). +[Stay tuned](/atom.xml) for more! + +## Projects Found Here + +- [yet another weblog](/blog): Thoughts on tech and life +- [euchre.live](https://euchre.live): A Euchre web-app for my family +- [jam-tuesday](/jam-tuesday): An archive of my jam setlists +- [uses](/uses.html): Software and hardware that I use +- [gopher://alexkarle.com]: my gopherhole -- phlog, notes & more! +- [https://git.alexkarle.com]: A personal git server + +## Contact / Elsewhere + +- Email: _contact AT this-domain_ +- IRC: `akarle` on [libera.chat](https://libera.chat) +- sourcehut: [`~akarle`](https://sr.ht/~akarle) diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-03-09 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-09 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-03-16 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-16 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-03-23 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-23 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-03-30 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-03-30 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-04-06 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-06 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-04-13 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-13 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-04-20 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-20 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-04-27 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-04-27 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-05-04 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-05-04 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-05-18 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-05-18 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-05-25 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-05-25 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-06-01 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-01 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-06-08 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-08 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-06-15 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-15 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-06-22 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-06-22 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-07-06 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-06 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-07-13 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-13 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-07-20 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-20 diff --git a/jam-tuesday/2021-07-27 b/www/jam-tuesday/2021-07-27 diff --git a/www/jam-tuesday/index.html b/www/jam-tuesday/index.html @@ -0,0 +1,293 @@ +<!DOCTYPE html> +<html lang="en"> +<head> +<meta charset="utf-8"/> +<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"> +<!-- Inspired by https://www.swyx.io/css-100-bytes/ --> +<style> +html { + max-width: 70ch; + padding: 3em 1em; + margin: auto; + font-size: 1em; + font-family: sans-serif; +} +footer { + margin-top: 50px; + font-size: .8em; +} +code { font-family: consolas, courier, monospace; } +h1 { font-size: 1.5em; } +h2 { font-size: 1.2em; } +h3 { font-size: 1.1em; } +blockquote, code pre { + background: #f2f2f2; + overflow: auto; + padding: 10px; + border: 2px solid black; +} +.jam-artists tr:nth-child(even) { + background-color: #e3e3e3; +} +td.jam-artists, th.jam-artists, table.jam-artists { + border: 1px solid black; +} +</style> +<title>Jam Tuesday Archive</title> +</head> +<body> +<small><code><a href="/">/home/alex</a> / <a href="/jam-tuesday">jam-tuesday</a></code></small> +<h1>Jam Tuesday Archive</h1> +<h2>About</h2> +<p> +From about October 2020 up until August 2021, my brother Matt and I +got together every Tuesday evening to play music. It started as a +way to stay sane during the COVID quarantine, but it quickly became +a tradition and a highlight of the week. No matter how stressful +work was, or what was going on in the outside world, we could leave +it all behind as we played some of our favorite tunes. +</p> +<p> +At some point (woefully late), I realized it would be fun to start +cataloging what we played. +</p> +<p> +This archive includes the setlists and some play stats. +</p> +<p> +There are no audio recordings (at least publicly), but there's a +stray note here and there to "set the scene". +</p> +<p> +The setlist notation is hopefully pretty straightforward. Unless +otherwise noted, I'm on guitar and Matt's on keys (and if only one +instrument is specified, it's me switching to it). We both +(attempt to) sing. Sometimes we even harmonize :) +</p> +<h2>Stats</h2> +<h3>Play Stats:</h3> +<ul> +<li> 19 Jam Sessions</li> +<li> 330 Songs Total</li> +<li> 159 Unique Songs</li> +<li> 87 Unique Artists</li> +</ul> +<h3>Top 10 Artists (Frequency, Name):</h3> +<ul> +<li> 40 The Front Bottoms</li> +<li> 37 Peach Pit</li> +<li> 29 Manchester Orchestra</li> +<li> 16 Vulfpeck</li> +<li> 16 Dr. Dog</li> +<li> 15 The Dear Hunter</li> +<li> 10 Atta Boy</li> +<li> 9 Cage The Elephant</li> +<li> 7 Lake Street Dive</li> +<li> 7 Her's</li> +</ul> +<h3>Top 10 Songs (Frequency, Name):</h3> +<ul> +<li> 12 Twin Size Mattress, The Front Bottoms</li> +<li> 11 Rhode Island, The Front Bottoms</li> +<li> 11 Alrighty Aphrodite, Peach Pit</li> +<li> 10 Shadow People, Dr. Dog</li> +<li> 10 Brian's Movie, Peach Pit</li> +<li> 8 The Beers, The Front Bottoms</li> +<li> 8 Jack and Blow, Atta Boy</li> +<li> 6 That I Miss You, Vansire</li> +<li> 6 Lauren, Men I Trust</li> +<li> 6 Drop the Guillotine, Peach Pit</li> +</ul> +<h2>Setlists</h2> +Updated weekly: +<ul> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-03-09">2021-03-09</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-03-16">2021-03-16</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-03-23">2021-03-23</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-03-30">2021-03-30</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-04-06">2021-04-06</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-04-13">2021-04-13</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-04-20">2021-04-20</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-04-27">2021-04-27</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-05-04">2021-05-04</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-05-18">2021-05-18</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-05-25">2021-05-25</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-06-01">2021-06-01</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-06-08">2021-06-08</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-06-15">2021-06-15</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-06-22">2021-06-22</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-07-06">2021-07-06</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-07-13">2021-07-13</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-07-20">2021-07-20</a></li> +<li><a href="/jam-tuesday/2021-07-27">2021-07-27</a></li> +</ul> +<h2>All Songs, by Artist</h2> +<table class="jam-artists"> +<tr><th>Artist</th><th>Song</th><th>Plays</th></tr> +<tr><td>311</td><td>Amber</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>A Great Big Pile Of Leaves</td><td>Alligator Bop</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>A Tribe Called Quest</td><td>Can I Kick It?</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Anderson .Paak</td><td>Make It Better</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Anderson .Paak & Bruno Mars</td><td>Leave the Door Open</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Atta Boy</td><td>Jack and Blow</td><td>8</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Walden Pond</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Bad Books</td><td>Baby Shoes</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Forest Whitaker</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>It Never Stops</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The After Party</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>You Wouldn't Have To Ask</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Beck</td><td>Loser</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Cage The Elephant</td><td>Cigarette Daydreams</td><td>6</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Shake Me Down</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Telescope</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Trouble</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Cake</td><td>Comfort Eagle</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Carpenters</td><td>Close To You</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Carrie Underwood</td><td>Before He Cheats</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Daniel Caesar</td><td>Japanese Denim</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Darwin Deez</td><td>Radar Detector</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Death Cab For Cutie</td><td>I Will Posess Your Heart</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Dojo Cat</td><td>Say So</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Dr. Dog</td><td>Nellie</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Shadow People</td><td>10</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Stranger</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The Beers/Shadow People</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The Breeze</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Twin Size/Shadow People/Beers</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Eurythmics</td><td>Sweet Dreams</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Eve 6</td><td>Inside Out</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Father John Misty</td><td>Real Love Baby</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td>Fleet Foxes</td><td>White Winter Hymnal</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Foo Fighters</td><td>Learn To Fly</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The Pretender</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Goo Goo Dolls</td><td>Iris</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Gorillaz</td><td>Feel Good Inc.</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Harvey Danger</td><td>Flagpole Sitta</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Her's</td><td>Blue Lips</td><td>6</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Cool With You</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Herbie Hancock</td><td>Chameleon</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td>Jay Som</td><td>Baybee</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Jimmy Eat World</td><td>The Middle</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>John Mayer</td><td>Moving On and Getting Over</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>No Such Thing</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Joyce Manor</td><td>Last You Heard of Me</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Kanye West</td><td>Golddigger</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Kate Bollinger</td><td>I Don't Wanna Lose</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Kevin Devine</td><td>Cotton Crush</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>I Could Be With Anyone</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Khalid</td><td>Talk</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Lake Street Dive</td><td>Call Off Your Dogs</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Hello Goodbye</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Hypotheticals</td><td>5</td></tr> +<tr><td>Lenny Kravitz</td><td>Fly Away</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Mac DeMarco</td><td>My Old Man</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Mac Miller</td><td>What's The Use</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td>Manchester Orchestra</td><td>Bed Head</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Everything To Nothing</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>I Can Barely Breathe</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>I Can Feel A Hot One</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>I've Got Friends</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Keel Timing</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Pride</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Shake It Out</td><td>5</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Telepath</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The Only One</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Tony The Tiger</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Virgin</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Matt</td><td>Original</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td>Matt and Alex</td><td>Original</td><td>5</td></tr> +<tr><td>Men I Trust</td><td>Lauren</td><td>6</td></tr> +<tr><td>Michael Jackson</td><td>Beat It</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Billie Jean</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Modern Baseball</td><td>Tears Over Beers</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Modest Mouse</td><td>Float On</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Natalie Imbruglia</td><td>Torn</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>No Doubt</td><td>Don't Speak</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Omar Apollo</td><td>The Two of Us</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td>OutKast</td><td>Ms Jackson</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Paper Kites</td><td>Bloom</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Parcels</td><td>Tieduprightnow</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Peach Pit</td><td>Alrighty Aphrodite</td><td>11</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Black Licorice</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Brian's Movie</td><td>10</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Chagu's Sideturn</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Drop the Guillotine</td><td>6</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Peach Pit</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Shampoo Bottles</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Techno Show</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Tommy's Party</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Phish</td><td>Character Zero</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td>Portugal. The Man</td><td>Feel It Still</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Prawn</td><td>Why You Always Leave A Note</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Radiohead</td><td>Creep</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Rage Against The Machine</td><td>Killing in the Name</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Red Hot Chili Peppers</td><td>Can't Stop</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td>Ripe</td><td>Caralee</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Goon Squad</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Pretty Dirty</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Talk to the Moon</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Robbie Hunter Band</td><td>Que Paso?</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Sammy Rae</td><td>Jackie Onassis</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Kick It To Me</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Santana</td><td>Smooth</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Stone Temple Pilots</td><td>Interstate Love Song</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Sublime</td><td>Doin Time</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Sugar Ray</td><td>Every Morning</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>Sure Sure</td><td>Good Thing</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Tame Impala</td><td>The Less I Know The Better</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Beatles</td><td>I've Just Seen A Face</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>With a Little Help From My Friends</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Black Keys</td><td>Tighten Up</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Cars</td><td>Just What I Needed</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Dear Hunter</td><td>A Sua Voz</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Black Sandy Beaches</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Deny It All</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Girl</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Misplaced Devotion</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Progress/Therma</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Red Hands</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The Moon/Awake</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>What it Means to Be Alone</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Eagles</td><td>Hotel California</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Front Bottoms</td><td>Cough It Out</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Flashlight</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Jim Bogart</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Legit Tattoo Gun</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Rhode Island</td><td>11</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The Beers</td><td>8</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Twin Size Mattress</td><td>12</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>West Virginia</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Head and The Heart</td><td>Honeybee</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Lost In My Mind</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Rivers and Roads</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td>The Raconteurs</td><td>Steady As She Goes</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>The White Stripes</td><td>We're Going To Be Friends</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Theo Katzman</td><td>You Could Be President</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Third Eye Blind</td><td>Semi Charmed Life</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Three Doors Down</td><td>Kryptonite</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Tonic</td><td>If You Could Only See</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Twiddle</td><td>When it Rains it Poors</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>USERx</td><td>Headsick</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td>Vampire Weekend</td><td>Flower Moon</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Sunflower</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td>Vansire</td><td>That I Miss You</td><td>6</td></tr> +<tr><td>Vulfpeck</td><td>1612</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Animal Spirits</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Aunt Leslie</td><td>3</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Baby I Don't Know Oh Oh</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Back Pocket</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>LAX</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Love is a Beautiful Thing</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Outro</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>Wait For The Moment</td><td>4</td></tr> +<tr><td>Weezer</td><td>Buddy Holly</td><td>2</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>If You're Wondering If I Want You To</td><td>1</td></tr> +<tr><td></td><td>The World Has Turned and Left Me Here</td><td>1</td></tr> +</table> +<br><br> +<p style="font-size: 0.7em">Last Updated: Tue Dec 28 16:56:08 EST 2021</p> +<p class="foot-license"> +© 2019-2021 Alex Karle | <a href="/">Home</a> | <a href="/license.html">License</a> +</p> +</body> +</html> diff --git a/www/license.txt b/www/license.txt @@ -0,0 +1,9 @@ +# License + +Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is +licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license +[(CC BY 4.0)](https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). + +Any code snippets, including the +[code used to build this site](https://sr.ht/~akarle/alexkarle.com) +are licensed under a [MIT license](/LICENSE). diff --git a/www/uses.txt b/www/uses.txt @@ -0,0 +1,104 @@ +# Software and hardware that I use + +I really enjoy a good "uses" post. I think the first I ever +stumbled across was [Wes Bos'](https://wesbos.com/uses/), back +when I was learning web-development. As someone fascinated by +developer tooling, I loved hearing what other programmers use in +their day-to-day lives. + +I try to keep this page up to date, both for my future nostalgia as +well as for anyone else out there who enjoys the "genre". + +## Software + +### Editor + +I got hooked on [`vim(1)`](https://vim.org) mid-college (~2017) +and never looked back. It's first on this list (with a dedicated +section!) because it was the "gateway program" that got me +interested in developer tooling in the first place! If not my +most important tool, it's definitely the most impactful. + +Other editors I use: + +- [`vi(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/vi.1) for system configs + (super snappy on OpenBSD) +- [`ed(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/ed.1) for fun and for slow/serial + connections (yes, really!) + +I try emacs every once and a while because I think Lisp is awesome +(and far superior to VimScript), but I don't really dig the "run +everything in emacs" approach. + +### Operating System + +I've been passionate about running free and open source (FOSS) +operating systems since ~2019 when I first started using Linux +seriously at work. At some point in ~2020, I discovered OpenBSD +and slowly started putting it on all of my personal machines. I'm +currently running: + +- [OpenBSD](https://openbsd.org) for my laptop, desktop, server + ([hosting this site](/blog/self-hosted.html)), and home router/firewall +- [Arch Linux](https://archlinux.org) for work (needed a cutting + edge kernel for newer work laptop) + +In the past I've also used Alpine Linux on my laptop and Debian on +my desktop. + +## Other Tools + +I'm a huge fan of command line tools for their composability and +keyboard-centric UI. Some of my favorites include: + +- [`git(1)`](https://git-scm.com) for all things plaintext: notes, code, + config backups, etc +- [`tmux(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/tmux.1) for terminal scrollback, + searching, copy/paste buffers, multiplexing, persistent sessions over + dropped [`ssh(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/ssh.1) connections... + really a necessity! +- [`mutt(1)`](https://mutt.org) for personal email (great for mailing lists!) +- [`pass(1)`](https://passwordstore.org) for password/secret management +- [`sh(1)`](https://man.openbsd.org/sh.1) for glueing it all together, of course! + +## Hardware + +### Keyboard + +After years of mushy laptop keyboards, I discovered mechanical +keyboards through a coworker and I've been clicking and clacking +happily ever since! + +I started off with an [Ultimate Hacking Keyboard](https://uhk.io) +with Kailh browns (had to be quiet in a shared office), but I've +been using a [Keyboardio Atreus](https://shop.keyboard.io/pages/atreus) +for about a year. I switched in a (successful!) attempt to +reduce finger movement and strain. Plus, I'm a remote worker +now, and I get to clack away at Kailh white switches, which is +awesome. + +### Laptop + +When I started really getting into Linux at work and home ~2019, I +installed Arch on my old macbook and suffered at the hands of +NVIDIA and poor hardware support until I ditched my macbook for a +[ThinkPad X220](https://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Category:X220) +(2011, i7, 2GB RAM) that I bought used for ~$130 off Ebay. A +simple upgrade to a SSD and it runs great! + +I use the laptop for casual browsing and hobby coding (I try to +ensure my hobby projects all run on old hardware!), but its CPU age +really shows on big websites or compilations. + +### Desktop + +I built my first desktop (a long standing nerd goal of mine) at the +start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 when it became clear I'd be +working from home and my 2GB of laptop RAM wouldn't cut it. + +I tried (and failed) to keep the parts entirely FOSS-friendly, but +I ended up getting a GPU that needed the AMDGPU firmware blobs +(hard to find a fully free graphics card these days it seems). +With a high-end CPU (AMD Ryzen 7 3700X) but a low-end GPU (Radeon +RX 560), it was a reasonable price. And with 16GB of RAM, it +handles my work environment well.